Montana Today’s Christmas Wine List From WineGuyMike™


Just as foods have a texture and firmness wines also have a quality of texture.  Remember we are looking for balance and a synergy between wine and the foods they are paired with.  A full bodied wine bold on texture should not be paired with delicate dishes nor should they be paired with a food dish that is big on flavor.  Big wine and big flavor just don’t work well together, we are looking for harmony.  A mild food dish would do well to be paired with a medium to light body wine which is what we are doing today in considering your Christmas Day wine list.

Yesterday TV Segment with wines; http://www.nbcmontana.com/video/30063511/index.html

Today I have chosen a number of wines that are affordable, most are $10.00 to $16.00.  These selections are very good wines that will enhance whatever you may be serving for your Christmas dinner.

Christmas Wine Flight

Saracco Moscato D´ Asti ($15.00’ish) 

Perfume of fresh peach, pear and aromatic white flowers. A gentle sparkle brightens the fruit and a tingle of sweetness hints of candied fruits.  This wine is perfect as refreshing aperitif or a light finish to a meal.  Saracco has perfected the balance of acid and residual sugar to make an incredibly light and floral sparkling wine.

Gruet Rose Brut ($10.59)

The Gruet can be enjoyed before and during dinner.  Rose is a diverse wine that pairs well with most foods so don’t be afarid to enjoy this selection during your dinner.  This is a delightful wine that really delivers.

This nearly garnet Rose, like all of Gruet’s non-vintage sparkling wines, it is aged 24 months en tirage.  It has a lovely, bright floral bouquet with hints of strawberry, raspberry, and cherry.  On the palate, it is rich and fruity in a dry, Brut style.  The flavor of berries continues on the palate, revealing more strawberry, raspberry, cherry.  This sparkler is lots of fun and very festive.

A-Z Pinot Gris ($10.49)

The Willamette Valley produces very good wine and this selection from A-Z will not disappoint.  I recommend this wine with Vegetarian dishes, Turkey or Ham dinners.  You’ll love this wine it is with your dinner.

The 2010 A to Z Pinot Gris leads with bright aromas of tropical fruits (lemon, lime, lychee, mango, passion fruit and kiwi) as well as melon, ginger, lemongrass and wet stone.  Succulent and juicy on the attack, the mid-palate is drenched with peach, spiced pear, baked apple, quince, hibiscus, white flower and mineral flavors.  On the finish, the acidity wraps up the wine with a clean, fresh palate and lasting impression of a wine with great purity and typicity balanced by some richness and depth.

Anselmi San Vincenzo ($12.25)

Turkey, Ham, or a Pork Roast is my recommendation for this lush and sophisticated wine.  This wine paired with a glazed pork tenderloin roast would be incredible for your Christmas dinner.

80% Garganega, 10% Chardonnay, 10% Sauvignon Blanc

Color – Light straw

Bouquet – Crisp and pure, with scents of minerals, lemon/lime, apricot and yellow apples.

Taste – Medium-bodied, dry and fresh, with notes of citrus fruit

Marc Bredif Vouvray 2008 from the Loire Valley, France ($21.99)

Chenin Blanc at its finest with this dry Vouvray.  Vouvray can be made in a dry to sweet style and the French do it best.  This holiday wine selection I have chosen for you is more expensive than most Vouvray’s but when you take one sip you will understand why.  This selection will go well Vegetarian dishes, white meats, Ham, and most seafood dishes.

The color is pale gold yellow.  It has a very intense and fruity nose with notes of white flowers and quince.  It has a subtle attack on the palette and a fresh structure and aromatic finish.

Chenin Chardonnay, a unique recipe 75% Chenin 25% Chardonnay ($9.99)

Turkey, Ham or even just a wonderful wine to drink.  This wine from the Southwestern Languedoc Rousillon region is a lovely wine and at this price you can’t go wrong.  It’s crisp, it’s creamy, yes a treasure of a wine.

The contrast between the Chenin’s minerality and the creamy Chardonnay is somewhat reminiscent of sweet and sour cooking.  Fresh, bold and full of flavour at entry with underlying notes of ripe grapes, followed by suave complexity.  Faintly floral shades of vanilla vie for position with lingering traces of toffee, while a touch of saltiness leads to a pleasantly surprising finish.

Wallace Brook 2009 Pinot Noir ($15.99)

Good Pinot Noir is hard to find at this price point but this wine is made by one of my favorite Willamette Valley winery’s, Adelsheim Vineyard.  This wine pairs fantastic with lamb, salmon, pork, or turkey.  An excellent choice for your Christmas dinner.

This Pinot Noir offers a complex nose of red fruits and vanilla.  The supple mouth feel layers raspberry and red cherry fruit, and is complemented by balanced oak and well-integrated tannins.

Cannonau di Sardegna D.O.C. Riserva (Under $11.22)

This wine is Old World and rustic in nature.  The Cannonau is native to Sardinia and is unique in aroma and on the palate.  I don’t recommend drinking this wine without a food accompaniment.  With food this will be one of the best food wines you will ever taste.  I recommend this a prime rib, roast beef, stew, and heavy appetizers.  An amazing food wine.

Bright ruby color, with purple hues, the aromas project ripe red berry, including strawberry and raspberry jam. In the mouth, coffee, spices and herbs, including an aroma of violets, plummy fruit flavours and aristocratic oak overtone. Full, round, fruit forward, consumer friendly taste profile. Oak aged for two years in large Slavonian casks with several additional months in the bottle.

Le Clos ($11.99)

A terrific companion to accompany a duck terrine laced with olives, a roast rack of lamb, roasted beef or pork roast with fines herbes, as well as pheasant with wild mushrooms or boeuf bourguignon.

45% Merlot, 20% Carignan, 20% Grenache, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon

It is unique in that it has a slight, refined oak character, highlighting a sturdy base of red fruit and oriental spices. Bringing into play terroir and savoir-faire, tradition and exotic flair, Le Clos seems to be like something out of “The Arabian Nights.” 

This wine displays an attractive raspberry red color with hints of garnet.  Its nose is lively and complex, with notes of red and black fruits.  Refined oak fragrance(very subtle) with hints of incense, spices (nutmeg, clove, ginger), anise, autumn woods and tobacco.  Le Clos is very soft on the palate, with a fresh, tangy acidity, and delivers wonderful balance.  It is well-structured yet elegant, with fine tannins.

2009 Felino Viña Cobos Malbec ($15.99)

I love to drink this wine from Paul Hobbs who makes wine in Napa and Sonoma during our summer months.  His wines fetch prices North of $100.00 in the U.S.  But in Argentina he makes wine that is sophisticated and complex yet inexpensive.  Sit down to dinner with any beef dish and you will think you are in heaven with this selection. 

Visually this 2009 Malbec presents a beautiful crimson color in the glass.  The nose of this South American beauty is ripe with red raspberry, anise, with a slight nuance of cocoa, a wonderful aroma.  The palate delivers a rich spicy mouth-feel that reveals fruit, a hint of caramel and mineral.  This malbec has a nice round balance with sturdy structure.  This wine is supple, smooth with refined tannin that makes this a great wine to drink and pair with food.  A long finish from this wine that you don’t want to end.

"from my table to yours" Merry Christmas

"from my table to yours" Merry Christmas

Advertisements

This week on the Radio Show© WineGuyMike™ “The Long and Winding Road” to Waitiri Creek Winery


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; the full length conversation betwen Paula and WineGuyMike http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/12/11/wine-guy-mike-for-1211/ If you are using Internet Explorer this podcast won’t be available until mid-day Monday; technical problem.

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

Sleep City Missoula www.SleepCity.com

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine and wine accessory gifts located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© perhaps Paul McCartney said it best on the Beatles Let It Be album; “The long and winding road, That leads to your door, Will never disappear, I’ve seen that road before, It always leads me here, Lead me to your door”.

"The Long and Winding Road" to Waitiri Creek Winery

"The Long and Winding Road" to Waitiri Creek Winery

Paula Ramage and her husband Allistar Ward have traveled extensively and lived abroad in different places throughout the world but home for them is the Central Otago wine region on the South Island of New Zealand.  This is the southernmost grape growing region in the world, but they produce very good wine.  Paula grew up in Alexandra and the Ward family farmed for many years on Malaghan’s Road, near Arrowtown.  Last week’s blog provided an overview of New Zealand as a wine country; http://wp.me/pFhHw-Ao  This is a land that is breathtakingly beautiful and produces some of the finest single varietal wines available. 

Paula Ramage has had at least 5 careers that she can recall but in spending time with her on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this week I’ll forevermore think of her as Ambassador of New Zealand and the New Zealand wine industry.  Needless to say she is a terrific spokesperson and extremely knowledgeable about her country and the wine industry in New Zealand and throughout the world.  Paula handles all of Waitiri Creek’s administrative business and development of offshore markets, a natural for a “reformed barrister”.  She has a lovely Kiwi accent that you cannot help loving too.

Allistar Ward is a merchant banking consultant full time, although he makes time to focus on vineyard development and as Paula puts it, “he juggles all the balls and keep them in the air”.

Viticulture Crew, Mark and Jason

Viticulture Crew, Mark and Jason

Jason Thomson is their very accomplished viticulturist along with his team Mark Naismith and Scott Culpan who run the day to day operations.  Interestingly the Waitiri Creek winemaker is a woman, Jen, from the Willamette Valley of Oregon.  As I mentioned last week many winemakers are now traveling winemakers who work in the Northern Hemisphere during its summer months and the Southern Hemisphere during their summer.  With the Willamette and Central Otago sharing similar latitudes with a focus on cool weather grape varietals it is a natural for winemakers like Jen.

Shanagolden Block in Summer

Shanagolden Block in Summer

In 1993 Paula and Allistar purchased their first vineyard the Shanagolden Block in Gibbston and planted Chardonnay in 1994.   The northerly facing block was ideal for sustainable viticulture and the lower half of this area provided a perfect location for the future wine tasting venue.

The Shanagolden Block was originally settled in 1867 by James Leslie, a Scot who had emigrated to New Zealand at the age of 17.  He and his partner, Thomas Kinross followed the Dunstan gold rush.  Kinross established the Gibbston store and Post Office and James Leslie was the butcher and baker but also continued to prospect for gold.

The vineyard has a micro-climate that produces ripe fruit earlier than most in the general area.  The soil composition is made up of glacial deposits and free draining alluvial soil matter (scheist).  This terrior is well suited to the cool weather grape varietals that Waitiri Creek produces.  This is where Jens’s Willamette Valley winemaking experience really shines.

Waitiri Creek’s portfolio of wines includes Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, Riesling, and Sauvignon Blanc.  The grape vines  of Waitiri Creek are all hand pruned and hand harvested.  New Zealand is aiming for all of its vineyards to be sustainably accredited by the end of 2012.  Compliance currently stands at about 93% – Waitiri Creek has been fully sustainable for some years.  Another interesting fact about New Zealand wines, 75% of the bottles are all screw tops.  The Kiwi’s are an environmentally conscience country and I applaud them for this effort.

Chardonnay Grape Harvest

Chardonnay Grape Harvest

The first vintage of Chardonnay was produced in 1998 and full production of three different varietals in 1999.   In 1996  Paula and Allistar decided that an old church building would serve as the Waitiri Creek tasting room, they needed a structure that would be harmonious with the terroir of the Shanagolden vineyard.  So a search which led them all over the lower part of the South Island, culminating in a visit to Wangaloa, near Kaitangata in 1998.  On first sight, the former Wangaloa Presbyterian Church would have sent less hardy souls running in the opposite direction….but not Paula and Allistar.  Negotiations began with the local community and ownership of the church was secured a year later.

Cellar Door

Cellar Door

The Waitiri Creek tasting room just celebrated its 10th anniversary at its new vineyard home.   This former Presbyterian church, built in 1893 was moved to its new location at Waitiri Creek 300km in one piece on the Shanagolden Block in 2000.

I want to thank my new friend Paula Ramage for sharing this rich history of the Central Otago wine region, New Zealand, and the Waitiri Creek Winery with the WineGuyMike™ audience.  From my home in Montana to the “The Long and Winding Road” down under, Happy Holidays to my friends in New Zealand and Waitiri Creek.

Waitiri Creek Wines

One of the keys to increased demand for Waitiri Creek wines is consistant quality.   Waitiri Creek has been recognized at domestic and international competitions every year since 1999 across their entire portfolio.  Their expansion into Bannockburn with the purchase of additional Central Otago fruit has now expanded their portfolio to include Rosé, Pinot Gris, Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling.

Pinot Noir

Waitiri Creek Pinot Noir 2007 The nose shows rich varietal layers of cherry and plums supported by an earthy complexity. The depth of fruit on the nose continues on the palate supported by a fine tannin structure, good integration of oak and a length of flavor that lingers on the tongue.

The nose displays complex notes of stewed cherries, cedar and mushrooms. This Pinot Noir shows the elegance of the 2008 vintage with a bright garnet hue and the perfume of violets and rose petals. The fruit driven palate has flavors of wild raspberries with hints of cinnamon, red cherries and succulent plums. On the finish there is a note of thyme and mushrooms. The silky tannins are woven seamlessly into a structure balanced by savory French oak and alcohol.

Rose

Rich strawberry and raspberry aromas dominate the nose and are supported by perfumed floral notes. The palate shows good berry fruit weight with strawberry and white peach aided by creamy texture. This wine is well balanced with a long, lingering, strawberry finish.

Chardonnay

Made in a fruit-driven New World style, this wine shows all the influences of classic Old World winemaking. The palate is rich and succulent with an appealing texture and displays outstanding primary fruit.  

Handpicked grapes were whole bunch pressed and the juice cold settled for two days before being racked to barrels with light yeast. The wine was then cool fermented using both commercial and indigenous yeasts. This Chardonnay spent 10 months in 100% French oak (22% new oak) and underwent 100% malolatic fermentation with weekly lees stirring. The finished wine was then racked, lightly fined and filtered prior to bottling in late-March 2009.

Riesling

This Riesling shows complex aromas of mandarin, pear, honeysuckle and orange blossom on the nose. The body has crisp citrus flavors, offset with spice and good length of finish. This wine has great cellaring potential and additional characters will develop in the bottle over time.

Riesling grapes from two different blocks were handpicked and combined. The grapes were whole bunch pressed using a bag press and then the juice was left to cold settle overnight, before being racked and inoculated with yeast.

Fermentation lasted several weeks with temperatures being maintained less than 13 degrees to retain optimum flavor. Once fermentation was complete the wine was sulphured, racked and blended. The wine was then lightly fined and cold and protein stabilized prior to sterile filtration and bottling in September 2008.

Pinot Gris

Floral and pear notes on the nose lead into a richly textured palate of nashi pear, citrus and spice flavors. The long finish is balanced by fine acidity.

First vintage fruit from Legends (Legends Vineyard, Felton Road) was hand-harvested.  One tank of the Legends juice was chilled with daily lees stirring for four days.  It was then racked taking light lees to blend with the second tank of Legends juice which was settled for one night and then racked clean to blend.  A portion of this juice went to a neutral French Oak barrel.  The blended Legends juice was warmed naturally to 14ºC and innoculated with an aromatic yeast before undergoing cool fermentation until optimal balance was achieved.

The fruit from Annika’s (Annika’s Vineyard, Wanaka Road) was hand-harvested with 50% left on skins overnight while the balance was cold settled overnight and racked with light lees.  The fruit with extended skin contact was racked cleanly.  The two Annika’s components were blended, warmed naturally to 14ºC and fermented using aromatic yeast.  A percentage of this juice was fermented in two neutral French Oak barrels.

The three barrels were stirred regularly after the peak of fermentation and then blended. The two separate tank blends were blended in August and underwent cold and protein stabilization before being lightly fined with isinglass and sterile filtered before bottling.

Sauvignon Blanc

For her 6th birthday, our niece Stella Paris Columbia B. Ramage who lives in Sydney and loves art had a wine named after her. This is a single vineyard, Gibbston fruit.

Stella

Stella

A nose of passionfruit, gooseberry and capsicum aromas lead to a lively palate displaying good balance and zesty acidity. Best served lightly chilled.

Sauvignon Blanc grapes were handpicked and then was de-stemmed and crushed prior to gentle pressing. The resulting juice was cool stainless steel fermented to retain fruit character. The wine was left on yeast lees for two months to help with mouth feel and complexity. The resulting wine was fined with milk casein prior to filtration and bottling.

Be sure to check out New Zealand wines from my show Sponsor Liquid Planet, “Best of Beverage”, in the Heart of Downtown Missoula.

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

“Wines from Way Down Under” this week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/12/04/wine-guy-mike-for-december-3/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors  

    

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

Sleep City Missoula, give the gift of sleep this holiday season  www.SleepCity.com

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine and wine accessory gifts located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana. 

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©  I’m enthused to share with you information about a little known wine region that is Down Under, and I mean really Down Under.  This little know wine country I’m referring to is located on the South Island of New Zealand.  Central Otago is the southernmost wine country in the world.

New Zealand is known for its naturally beautiful coastline, majestic mountains, rolling hills and desirable weather, especially if you grow grapes and make wine.  If you think Lord of The Rings and about extreme bungee jumping this really captures the New World enthusiasm of winemaking in the land way down under.

New Zealand North and South Island Wine Regions

New Zealand North and South Island Wine Regions

 

In New Zealand there are two islands, North and South, that both produce magnificent wines.   There are 10 recognized wine regions within New Zealand, but five of them stand out as the recognized areas of importance.  The North Island of New Zealand has three major wine regions:

  1. Hawkes Bay that produce Bordeaux Blends, Chardonnay, and Syrah
  2. Martinsborough/Wairrarpa produces Pinot Noir
  3. Gisbourne is a Chardonnay region

The South Island includes the very well known wine region of Marborough and the lesser known wine country of Central Otago.  The famous Marlborough region is known throughout the world for their Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir wine.  Central Otago produces Pinot Noir that is both distinct and a great example of wine that is true to the varietal standard.

The North Island’s climate is warmer and has much higher humidity than the South Island that enjoys hot dry summer days with cooler nights, particularly in the Central Otago region.  Autumns are crisp and cool while winters can be very snowy and cold.  Summer days are long and the winter days are short and at 45° latitude the Central Otago wine region is the most southerly grape growing region of the world.  The vast differences in climate between the North and South islands typically separates their grape harvest by 6-7 weeks.

Historically the economy of the Central Otago region has thrived on sheep farming, fruit orchards, and due to the natural majestic beauty of the South Island  skiing and tourism.  The steady growth of the wine industry is having a positive impact on the country’s economy.

New Zealand’s Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir wines are today recognized as world class wines.  The winemaking industry is so young in New Zealand that it is just now beginning to understand the full potential of the soil and the weather.  There are over 25 different grape varietals planted in the various wine countries of New Zealand, all with great potential.  75% of all grape vines in New Zealand are less than 10 years old.  Pinot Gris and Syrah are two varietals that are up and coming to watch for from this land way down under.

Ninty Percent of the Sauvignon Blanc produced in New Zealand comes from the Marlborough wine region.  Over 50% of all the wineries in New Zealand are located in this area also.

New Zealand’s proximity to the International dateline provides its grapes the first place in the world for the vineyards to bask in the early morning sun.  Did you know that the wine produced in New Zealland is 80% white and 20% red?

To give you a little perspective on how young the wine country of New Zealand is in 1985 there were only 100 recognized wineries.  Today there are nearly 1,000 wineries in New Zealand and as I mentioned previously 75% of the vines are less than ten years old.  The first officially recorded vintage of wine made in New Zealand was in 1836.  But it was during the Gold Rush era of the 1860’s that growing grapes and the thought of winemaking began in earnest so they have been dabbling in winemaking for a long time.  It was in 1986 though the New Zealand government offered grape farmer’s cash subsidy to anyone of them who uprooted the high volume producing Muller Thurgau grapes and dedicate their land to producing high quality wine grape varietals of Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Pinot Noir.  Make no mistake now their varietal wines are some of the best in the world.

In 1996 there were only 1,000 acres of vineyards dedicated to the Pinot Noir grapes, but today there are nearly 15,000 acres dedicated.  There will be much more in the near future though as the young winemakers of New Zealand have persisted and now better understand the Terroir of this beautiful land down under, some of the finest Pinot Noir in the world is being produced there.  In fact it is not uncommon to find winemakers from the United States whose focus is Pinot Noir and have either gone to school or interned in New Zealand.

New Zealand touts itself as the Sauvignon Blanc capital of the world.  These incredible wines are known for their aromatics.  New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc’s are often described as pungent wines that are a bit aggresive, herbaceous, tropical, with nuances of grapefruit and zesty lime flavors.  Some are even said to smell like cat pee.  How can you not love that, truly the New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc’s are incredible wines that I encourage you to try.  Dog Point is one of my personal favorite Sauvignon Blanc wines.

Shanagolden vineyard, Waitiri Creek

Shanagolden vineyard, Waitiri Creek

Next week Paula Ramage co-owner of Waitiri Creek Winery will be joining me on the radio show.  Paula will be the first female winery owner featured on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© and I’m very excited to introduce you to her.  We are going to learn all about the wines of Waitiri Creek and the South Island of New Zealand in general.  Waitiri Creek produces Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Riesling, and Chardonnay wine of distinct character.  I’ll see you on the radio wine friends.

This week’s featured wines 2011 Dog Point Sauvignon Blanc and 2010 Sherwood Estate Pinot Noir.  Both of these selections are available at Liquid Planet in the heart of Downtown Missoula.

2011 Dog Point Sauvignon Blanc

This wine has a straw green color in the glass.  The nose is an melody of aroma, experience the allure of tropical fruit, ripe citrus, lemongrass and wonderful passionfruit.  On the palate the Dog Point delivers subtle texture, crispness, nice acidity, and a hint of mineral.  This wine pairs nicely with seafood, pale mild cheeses, or white meats.  Drink now or cellar for up to three years.

2010 Sherwood Estate Pinot Noir

This very nice Pinot Noir from Sherwood Estate is a fruit forward wine lead by rich plum and earthy tones on the nose.  The palate has a sweet entry and a rich mouthfeel that is balanced and well structured, supported with refined tannins.

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

Have You Been Naughty Or Nice? This week on the Radio Show© WineGuyMike™ has Great Holiday Gift Advice


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/11/27/wine-guy-mike-for-november-27/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

Sleep City Missoula  www.SleepCity.com

Liquid Planet, “Best of Beverage” in Downtown Missoula

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Welcome to the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this Sunday morning.

Regardless of whether you have been naughty or nice, WineGuyMike has some great holiday wine gift advice.  The very thought of shopping for the “right” wine or wine gift can be cause for great trepidation within the hearts of many.  So Take a deep breath and remember-this is a great time of year to celebrate friendships, family, and to be thankful for the peace and abundance we enjoy.

The holiday season is nigh upon us and it is the time of year, and no matter what holiday we celebrate, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas or Festivus we can be assured of one thing-exchanging gifts.

Before you go shopping I recommend making a list of the people you are going to buy wine gifts for.  Ask yourself-what do they like?  What color or style of wine do they drink, how much does that special person usually spend, do they serve wine in proper glasses, or do they use tumblers from their favorite fast food customer appreciation collection?  You get the point a little thought prior to shopping will streamline your adventure.

Shopping for wine or wine related gifts, http://on.fb.me/uYQ1HN, should be a pleasurable and gratifying process, remember this can be fun shopping for the special people in your life.  I was shopping a few days ago at Liquid Planet in Downtown Missoula and realized this is the type of wine and gift shopping experience I desire.  Their retail manager, Heather, has done a beautiful job in merchandising the store, and in particular the wine section.  This probably is like girls gone shoe shopping.

When picking out a gift, there are a multitude of great wine gift ideas.  Let’s keep it simple starting with the wine; red wine on the simplest level is light, medium, or full bodied.  Red wine will have aromas of red or black fruit; you may smell spice, earthiness, or even some tobacco, leather, or maybe a little bacon.  That’s right bacon, many French winemakers would tell you that to have a sense of animal in their wines is a component of “Terroir,” or a sense of place.  Does the special person you are shopping for prefer red wines that express more fruit or do they like wine with more tannin or grittiness?

White wines present very different tastes and scents than red wines.  Aromas in white wines will vary, with scents of flowers, fruit, citrus, or beautiful tropical fruits being common.  In your mouth a white wine may taste tart, express minerals like stone or slate, or it may even be somewhat sweet.

How about wine glasses?  Many are unaware how important wine glasses are.  The Riedel wine glass company has been around for three hundred years.  Their glasses are a masterful combination, artfully blending form and function.  Good wine glasses are designed to allow you to visually examine wine, focus the aroma of the wine correctly, and then deliver the wine on your palate in exactly the right spot. 

Wine decanters are also a terrific gift to consider for a wine lover.  Decanting is generally a process reserved explicitly for red wines.  When a wine is poured into a traditional decanter the wine is thoroughly exposed to oxygen and helps to open the wine and settle the tannins.  There are a multitude of differing decanters; some are even attached right to the bottle-certainly not traditional, but clever nonetheless. 

Aerators are devices of decanting “in the moment.”  This process has gained popularity and can be terrific for spontaneous gatherings or an option when headed to a casual restaurant or bar.  I still prefer traditional decanting but if company arrives unexpectedly at your front door this holiday season, as it is apt to do, and you want to share a glass of wine the aerators are a great option. 

Please visit Liquid Planet in Downtown Missoula if you live or visit here to see the comprehensive selection of wines and wine gifts they offer.  You can also visit Liquid Planet online at http://www.LiquidPlanet.com.  It truly is a holiday shopping experience.  I wish you and your family a holiday season filled with good cheer, health, and abundance.

"from my table to yours", Happy Holidays

"from my table to yours", Happy Holidays

WineGuyMike’s Thanksging Day wine selections with Rob Hudson


Here are a few of WineGuyMike and Rob’s favorite wines to go with your Thanksgiving Day dinner.  Remember if you like red wine you will want to choose a wine that is light to medium bodied, has a good balance of fruit and acid.  A white wine that pairs well with Thanksgiving Day dinner should be rich, lush, and slightly tart. 

Thanksgiving Day wines on Montana Today; http://www.nbcmontana.com/video/29832819/index.html 

Thanksgiving Day Wines

2008 Balletto Gewurztraminer

The aroma of Lychee fruit, guava, red pear and granny smith apple aromas are ever present in this wine. Bright fruit and citrus flavors highlight the dominate aromas of this beautiful Gewurztraminer.  Once in your mouth tropical flavors from the nose translate to the palate and are accompanied by subtle tangerine and lemon.

The wine is lush in texture yet light, balanced tannins and a delightful finish of toffee, lingering apple, and pear make this a perfect wine to compliment your thanksgiving turkey and all of the lovely side dishes.

2009 Balletto Pinot Gris

This Pinot Gris is a complex, pale, straw-colored wine that opens with musky and exotic fresh fig and floral honey tones.  The secondary aromas reveal ripe red apple, melon and lemon. The aromas are ever-changing and intoxicating, and on the palate this wine is lush and perfectly viscous with a dose of tartness that balances and holds the wine together.

2010 Balletto Russian River Valley Pinot Noir

This dark, garnet-colored Pinot Noir is floral with aromas of rose petals, spice, ginger, cassis and fruit aromas of raspberry.  There is a bit of dusty earth with just hint of vanilla too. This wine is showy with a seamless viscosity that is balanced with a healthy bit of tartness to keep the wine fresh and lively. It’s full in the palate with fine, coco-powder-like tannins.  A long beautiful finish.

Here is another wine that will pair nicely with a Thanksgiving meal and guests will certainly enjoy.

2010 Hugel Gentil

The Hugel Gentil revives an ancient Alsace tradition that wines produced from a blend of noble varietals were called “Gentil”.

Hugel Gentil is a traditional Alsace blend of primarily Gewurztraminer paired with varying amounts of Pinot Gris, Riesling, Muscat and Sylvaner.

The Gentil blend of Noble grapes from Alsace region display a light youthful color in the glass and is ripe with floral, fruit and notes of spice.  This wine is rich, yet dry with a hint of lemon zest and mineral is the perfect complement for your dinner.  This is an outstanding Thanksgiving wine selection.

2010 Hestia Cellars Chenin Blanc

This is a beautiful medium body Chenin Blanc.  Rich aromas of melon, nectarine, and soft honey notes yet remains dry and crisp.  Ripe with citrus and grapefruit this wine has generous acidity.  The Hestia Chenin Blanc has great balanced and is the perfect accompaniment to Thanksgiving dinner.

Reynvaan wines are made by Matt Reynvaan who was noted as one of the top 30 winemakers under 30 years old in the world last year.  All three of these Syrah wines are some of the best in the world.  Each wine is blended with Viognier, Rousanne, or Marsanne which are white wine varietals.  This is traditional in the Northern Rhone of France.  All three of these wines are very special.

Syrah Walla Walla Valley The Contender 2008

Ripe and expressive, offering a plush, soft mouthful of stony mineral, cola and sassafras flavors, with a welling up of black cherry and dark plum character as the finish persists impressively.  Delivers depth, power and elegance.

Syrah Walla Walla Valley In The Rocks 2008

Smooth and expressive, with layers of cherry, sassafras, black olive and black pepper gliding over a polished frame, lingering enticingly.  Offers depth and elegance, without excess weight.

Syrah Walla Walla Valley The Unnamed Syrah 2008

Brimming with rich berry flavors and scads of mineral notes, this sets up a marvelous tension between the two flavor poles and remains electric through the long, expressive finish.  Shows depth, roundness and a distinctive profile on a polished frame.

"from my table to yours" Happy Thanksgiving

"from my table to yours" Happy Thanksgiving

Giving Thanks for a Grape Harvest this week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/11/20/wine-guy-mike-for-november-20/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

Liquid Planet, “Best of Beverage”, located in Downtown Missoula www.LiquidPlanet.com

Sleep City Missoula, “Giving A Good Night’s Sleep To Those In Need” 2401 North Reserve Street  www.SleepCity.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Welcome to the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this Sunday morning.

Thanksgiving is a time of celebration and reflection, a tradition in history dating back to the early 1600s.  Following harvest, the tradition was for America’s first farmers, the Native Americans and the earliest European settlers (Pilgrims) to celebrate and share the bounty with their communities. The Thanksgiving traditions continue today, as families sit down to share food and drink, reminisce, and be thankful.

Just as the first farmers would celebrate harvest, it is also a time of celebration in vineyards around the world — except for in South America or down under where summer is just beginning.  Grape farmers in the Northern Hemisphere are patiently waiting and watching their crops with great anticipation.  Consumed by weather reports, farmers carefully examine the fruit in each vineyard daily.  Measuring Brix – or the sugar content of the grape – is a daily chore for the grape farmer.

Grape farming, just like any type of farming, can be stressful. With the late arrival of spring this year, the grape vines were weeks behind in producing grapes. During this past growing season, all varieties of fruit and produce were behind schedule due to weather conditions. 

With grapes, as the clusters grow and mature, the farmer waits for what is known as veraison, or when the grapes begin to soften, turn color and begin to ripen.  As the growing season progresses, the grape farmer watches over the grapes, tending and pruning to maximize the concentration of fruit within the grapes.  

As the growing season nears the end, the farmer walks through the vineyards, carefully scrutinizing the grapes and wielding a small device called a refractometer.  This device allows the farmer to know the exact moment his grapes are ready to be picked.  The sugar in the grapes has now reached a level needed to make wine.  Stand back because this is when the frenzy in the vineyard begins.

Quite literally at that moment, the call goes out to the grape-picking crew that has been on standby just waiting for the farmer’s declaration that the grapes have ripened to perfection.  Picking crews are real experts and amazing to watch work. They are able to harvest fruit at a frenetic pace, yet still handle the fruit with a gentle hand.  The grape harvest is a race to get the grapes off the vine as the sugar in the fruit has peaked.

Mother Nature plays an important role in the grape harvest. Trying to harvest when the fall rains come is very difficult.  If grapes hang on the vine at the end of their ripening cycle and heavy rains begin, the grapes will absorb excessive water, resulting in wines that are thin – a difficult situation for the winemaker.  Winemakers live for great vintages of grapes, or ones that need very little attention once the grapes have been crushed and are in the tank fermenting.  Good winemakers will tell you that great wines are made in the vineyard.

Now that the grapes have been harvested, the crush begins.  Crush is a term used in the wine industry for the harvesting and pressing of grapes, a very exciting time at a vineyard and winery.  Once complete, the vineyard crew is finished and the grapes are now in the hands of the winemaker and their team.  

At this point, it’s time for the process of fermentation, which involves putting the grapes in a tank and using their natural yeast – or an inoculated commercial strain of yeast – to work with the sugar in the grapes to produce alcohol.  If the harvest was a great vintage, the winemaker will not need to manipulate the wines, which is the ideal situation.  The grapes ferment for different lengths of time depending on the type and style of wine a winemaker is making.  It is during this process that the color of a wine, the alcohol level and the amount of tannin in a wine is determined. 

Once the fermentation is complete, the wine is ready to be aged in steel tanks or wooden barrels.  It is very common today to buy a bottle of wine that is a blend of the same juice – some was aged in a steel tank while some may have been aged in oak barrel.  This is where a winemaker’s expertise is important. Tradition, experience and a winemaker that has made many vintages of wine is critical in producing quality wine.

It’s clear that in the grape-growing business, the harvest and the crush are both stressful and exciting times.  During the crush, there is an electric atmosphere of celebration and thankfulness that is contagious. 

Each year, the wineries share their harvest with us in the form of a bottle of wine.  There are a few great wines that are available at Liquid Planet during this season of Thanksgiving.  Look for more wines throughout this month at http://www.WineGuyMike.wordpress.com or on Facebook at WineGuyMike.

Three excellent wines this year are from the Russian River Valley in Sonoma, California.  Both of these wines are from the Balletto Vineyards & Winery, which was featured this summer on the WineGuyMike radio show.

2008 Balletto Gewurztraminer

The aroma of Lychee fruit, guava, red pear and granny smith apple aromas are ever present in this wine. Bright fruit and citrus flavors highlight the dominate aromas of this beautiful Gewurztraminer.  Once in your mouth tropical flavors from the nose translate to the palate and are accompanied by subtle tangerine and lemon.

The wine is lushly textured and light, balanced tannins and a delightful finish of toffee, lingering apple, and pear make this a perfect wine to compliment your thanksgiving turkey and all of the lovely side dishes. 

2009 Balletto Pinot Gris

This Pinot Gris is a complex, pale, straw-colored wine that opens with musky and exotic fresh fig and floral honey tones.  The secondary aromas reveal ripe red apple, melon and lemon. The aromas are ever-changing and intoxicating, and on the palate this wine is lush and perfectly viscous with a dose of tartness that balances and holds the wine together.

2010 Balletto Russian River Valley Pinot Noir

This dark, garnet-colored Pinot Noir is floral with aromas of rose petals, spice, ginger, cassis and fruit aromas of raspberry.  There is a bit of dusty earth with just hint of vanilla too. This wine is showy with a seamless viscosity that is balanced with a healthy bit of tartness to keep the wine fresh and lively. It’s full in the palate with fine, coco-powder-like tannins.  A long beautiful finish.

Here is another wine that will pair nicely with a Thanksgiving meal and guests will certainly enjoy.

2010 Hugel Gentil

The Hugel Gentil revives an ancient Alsace tradition that wines produced from a blend of noble varietals were called “Gentil”.

Hugel Gentil is a traditional Alsace blend of primarily Gewurztraminer paired with varying amounts of Pinot Gris, Riesling, Muscat and Sylvaner.

The Gentil blend of Noble grapes from Alsace region display a light youthful color in the glass and is ripe with floral, fruit and notes of spice.  This wine is rich, yet dry with a hint of lemon zest and mineral is the perfect complement for your dinner.  This is an outstanding Thanksgiving wine selection.

You will find these beautiful Thanksgiving wines at Liquid Planet in downtown Missoula.

"from my table to yours", Happy Thanksgiving to you and your families

"from my table to yours", Happy Thanksgiving to you and your families

Riedel Wine Glasses, A Wine Delivery System by Design this week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links:

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/11/13/wine-guy-mike-for-november-13/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors     

 

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

Liquid Planet, “Best of Beverage”, located in Downtown Missoula www.LiquidPlanet.com

Sleep City Missoula , “Giving A Good Night’s Sleep To Those In Need” 2401 North Reserve Street www.SleepCity.com

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Good Sunday morning and welcome to the WineGuyMike radio show.  I recently had the pleasure of attending a stemware demonstration with Maximillian Riedel.  The Riedel Wine Glass Company has been making wine glasses for 300 years and Maximilian Riedel is the 11th generation family member representing their wine glass company.

I personally have used Riedel stemware for 20 years to enjoy, savor, and taste wines.  After two decades of experience and familiarity with a product one would “assume” the knowledge gained by use or consumption of a product that you might qualify as somewhat of an expert.  Boy was I wrong, ouch, humbled once again.

I have studied wine nearly my entire life but the 90 minutes I spent in the wine glass demonstration with Maximilian was not only the best presentation I have ever attended, but also the most compelling.  This demonstration truly stirred my wine soul.  If you ever have the opportunity to attend a Riedel Wine Glass demonstration please do not miss it.

We have all heard the term “form versus function”, for the Riedel Wine Glass Company it is all about form and function.  I’ll get back to this point but first I would like to share a few insights about wine.

When we open a bottle of wine to let it breath, decant, or aerate the wine with one of the devices that have been developed to enhance our wine experience.  Oxygen “opens up” wine and brings out the aroma of the wine.

There are 2-3 elements of wine that create aroma and flavor.  The first one of these elements is the fruit.  The second element is the yeast that is used to ferment the wine.  Whether the winemaker uses a natural or commercial strain of yeast the fruit and yeast combine during fermentation to produce aroma and flavor or sense of taste.  The third influence upon the wine in your glass may be the oak barrel that the wine was aged in.  Some varietals of white wine are fermented and aged in steel, in this case there is no oak influence to the sense of taste or aroma.  Many white wines today are fermented and aged in steel tanks with some or all of the white wine spending a brief amount of time in oak barrels.  This will influence the taste and aroma of a wine.  Today’s trend though, “Oak is Out”.  Most white wine styles today are trending towards crisp, bright fruit in white wines.

Red wine and some varietals of white wine like Chardonnay spend more time in oak barrels.  Red wines in particular benefit from barrel aging. During fermentation red wines get their color from the skin of the grape. Tannin occurs as a result of grapes and their skins soaking together during the fermentation process.  Barrel aging allows the red wines to develop depth of color and refine or settle tannin which is the grittiness you experience when drinking a red wine.  Different varietals produce different amounts of tannin.  For example Pinot Noir will express less tannin than Cabernet Sauvignon.

So we know fruit, yeast and wood produce aroma, flavor, and tactile sensation when you drink wine.  Your palate or more commonly known as the tongue can sense four different tastes and possibly five.  Our sense of tastes are;  sweet, bitter, salty, sour, and perhaps an ability to sense MSG otherwise known as umami.  The mouth also has the ability to “feel” cool, warm, dryness, tingling, a coating feeling, and a feeling of numbness.

Sweetness is perceived immediately when you taste a wine as this area is located right on the tip of your tongue.  Acidity in a wine is recognized in the cheek area, on the sides of the tongue which is the area that senses “sour” flavors, and then also in the back of the throat.  Lighter red wines and white wines generally have a higher degree of acidity.

The middle of the tongue is the area that recognizes anything salty.  In the case of wine this is where tannin which is a tactile sensation, not a flavor, is felt.  When wines are young the tannins are what make a wine present as too dry.

Fruit and its individual varietal characteristics are smells not tastes.  But the weight of the wines fruit will be felt on the middle of your tongue.  This is why  wines are referred to as light, medium, or full bodied.

The aftertaste or what is referred to as the finish of a wine is what happens when you actually swallow wine.  In a good wine this is a very pleasing sensation as all of the components of a wine come together in harmony and balance then linger in your mouth and mind.

So why is the glassware such an important companion to good wine?  The Riedel Wine Glass Company has designed a wine delivery system, the wine glass, which is varietal specific.  The Riedel wine glass presents the aroma and the taste of wine perfectly.  Form versus function is not so much a term that describes conflict but better describes the intersection of form and function united for a best purpose.  This is exactly what a Riedel wine glass delivers to our nose and our palate.  A varietal correct wine glass from the Riedel Wine Glass Company has the ability to make 10 dollar wine taste like 100 dollar wine. 

Prior to setting in on the stemware demonstration with Maximilian I was very much of the mindset that great stemware was reserved for expensive wine.  Most of us may enjoy a daily glass of wine; this is what I refer to as a daily drinker, a bottle of wine for twelve dollars or under.  The right wine glass will really enhance an affordable wine.

I’m going to share pictures of five Riedel wine glasses that you must have.  Once you have tasted wine from a Riedel wine glass you will understand that these varietal specific wine glasses accomplish three things.  First the glass holds the wine within the shape of the varietal specific body of the glass.  Due to the quality and shape of the glasses it is very easy to visually examine your wine.  The opening or rim of each specific glass allows aroma from the wine to be revealed, and enjoyed.  The glass allows a person to discern the aromatics of a wine.  Secondly the Riedel wine glasses target and direct wine onto the correct area of the palate.  This is also specific to each varietal of wine, for instance drinking wine from the Riesling/Sauvignon Blanc glass is delivered directly to the tip of the tongue where it is best recognized for its varietal nuances.  If you are drinking a big Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley the Riedel wine glass delivers this wine onto the mid to back palate where the nuances of this varietal are best distinguished.

The pictures that I share visually demonstrate how the trajectory of wine will be delivered to the palate.  It is important to note the shape or pattern of wine as it lies in the body of a glass that is held at an angle.  I have tipped the glass and allowed the wine to flow to the rim of the glass.  Notice how the wine spreads both vertically and horizontally in the glass once it has been tipped.

The first glass is Riedel’s Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc glass, notice the wine as I hold the glass at an angle and allow the wine to flow to the lip of the glass.  This is how this wine will be trajected onto your palate.  You can see this wine will hit the palate right up front.  This allows the palate to enjoy the sweetness of the fruit on the tip of the tongue.

Riedel Riesling & Sauvignon Blanc Wine Glass

Riedel Riesling & Sauvignon Blanc Wine Glass

The diamond shape you see in the newest Riedel Chardonnay wine glass is truly reflective of today’s style of Chardonnay as demanded by consumers.  At most gatherings you taste wine at you will often hear comments from wine drinkers that they no longer desire heavy handed oak in their Chardonnay.  Riedel has responded to the consumer by designing a glass that is diamond shaped.  Many Chardonnay wines now have much more influence from cold fermentation.  The result is a Chardonnay wine that is bright with fruit and acidity.  The new style of Chardonnay may be aged in a combination of steel tanks and oak barrels.  Chardonnay is a full body white wine whereas a Sauvignon Blanc or Riesling are much lighter in body and are non-oaked in flavor and style.  When you examine both pictures that I have shared with you it is very easy to see the pattern of wine that will be transferred onto the palate is very different.  The diamond shape glass focuses the bright, and bigger fruit aroma to the nose while the pattern of wine that flows to the palate is broad.  This is in direct comparison to what is delivered by the Riesling style glass.  Once again Chardonnay is a fuller fruit that typically has some influence from oak aging.  This will vary depending on the style dictated by winemakers.  The dry nature of the Chardonnay grape combined with a slight nuance of tannin from oak aging is delivered mid-palate.  Wine delivery by design, this is what Riedel has engineered into each and every wine glass.

Riedel's newest style Chardonnay Wine Glass

Riedel's newest style Chardonnay Wine GlassRiedel Pinot Noir Wine Glass

 Red wine glasses from Riedel.

Riedel Pinot Noir Wine Glass

Riedel Pinot Noir Wine Glass

The Riedel Pinot Noir glass as you will note in this picture delivers wine close to the tip of the tongue so that the sweetness of the fruit will be enjoyed. You will notice that the wine near the lip of the glass is not nearly as broad as the Sauvignon Blanc, thus the wine is projected just behind the tip of the tongue.   As you will also note that the pattern of the wine in the glass suggests that the wine will then spread to the mid-palate.  Remember that the fine tannin and acidity of the fruit will be recognized by the middle of the tongue and cheek areas of the mouth.  

Riedel Bordeaux Wine Glass

Riedel Bordeaux Wine Glass

Riedel’s Red Bordeaux glass and their newest large Bordeaux style glass which appears to be a Bordeaux style wine glass on steroids are great examples of form and function.  The new large red wine glass is designed to accommodate a new style or trend in red wines that are being produced in warmer climate zones like Napa Valley.  Some of these big powerful red wines have high alcohol content approaching fourteen percent with some even reaching 15%.  Riedel recognized that wines this big and powerful need a deep glass with a large body. Examine the different pattern that the wine forms within the glass as they are tipped at an angle. The Pinot Noir and Bordeaux style wines lie very differently within their respective glasses when tilted at an angle.

Large Riedel Red Wine Glass for big red's high in % of alcohol

Large Riedel Red Wine Glass for big red's high in % of alcohol

Perhaps one of the most important things to understand about the Riedel Wine Glass Company is that evolution of design never stops.  They currently are developing brand specific wine glasses for special wines from around the world.  They also recognize that styles and trends in wine and grape growing continues to change.  Viticulturists worldwide now understand that some grape varietals may be best suited to a valley, the hillside, or grow best on the hiltops.  Rest assured that The Riedel Wine Glass Company is paying attention and designing glasses for what is to come.

Try these two wines with your Thankgiving dinner, they will not disappoint.

2010 Russian River Valley Pinot Noir

Riedel's Pinot Noir and Champagne glass. That's right now recommended for Champagne too

Riedel's Pinot Noir and Champagne glass. That's right now recommended for Champagne too

This dark, garnet-colored Pinot Noir is floral with aromas of rose petals, spice, ginger, cassis and fruit aromas of raspberry.  There is a bit of dusty earth with just hint of vanilla too. This wine is showy with a seamless viscosity that is balanced with a healthy bit of tartness to keep the wine fresh and lively. It’s full in the palate with fine, coco-powder-like tannins.  A long beautiful finish.

Here is another wine that will pair nicely with a Thanksgiving meal and guests will certainly enjoy.  Both of these wines are available at Liquid Planet in Downtown Missoula. 

Gentil Hugel 2010

Riedel Riesling & Sauvignon Blanc Glass

Riedel Riesling & Sauvignon Blanc Glass

This white wine is a beautiful blend of the Noble grapes from the Alsace region in France. It displays a light youthful color in the glass and is ripe with floral, fruit.

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"