This Week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© Maximilian Riedel CEO for Riedel Crystal of America


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and U 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast with

Last week’s podcast with Courtney Kingston of Kingston Family Vineyards; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/09/15/wine-guy-mike-for-september-16/

YouTube preview for this week’s show with Kingston Family Vineyards; http://youtu.be/EhuigtsNQdQ

Recent Podcast with head winemaker of Balletto Vineyards & Winery, Mr. Anthony Beckman; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/07/29/wine-guy-mike-for-july-29/

Recent week’s podcast; What You Need To Know About Wine  http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/07/15/wine-guy-mike-for-july-15/

Recent podcast; (full length conversation) with Maximilian Riedel, CEO Riedel Crystal of America http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/06/24/wine-guy-mike-for-june-24/

NBC Montana Today TV Segment; Perfect Patio Wines and food pairing; http://www.nbcmontana.com/news/Mike-Tornatore-8-7-12/-/14594602/15999458/-/67a5ri/-/index.html

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link:

http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sleep City Missoula  www.SleepCity.com

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana

Maximilian Riedel

Maximilian Riedel

What’s in a Glass?

Recently, I had the pleasure of attending a stemware demonstration with Maximillian Riedel, the 11th generation family member representing the Riedel Wine Glass Company. Riedel has been making grape varietal specific wine glasses for 300 years, and I have been using their stemware for 20 years.

I have studied wine nearly my entire life but the 90 minutes I spent in the demonstration was by far but also the most compelling.  This demonstration truly stirred my wine soul. 

 Form versus function is a familiar term, and for the Riedel Company it is a combination of both.  When we open a bottle of wine to let it breathe, decant, or aerate the wine we are introducing oxygen which “opens up” the wine and brings out the aroma and flavor of the wine.

There are 2-3 elements of wine that create aroma and flavor.  The first element is the fruit, and the second is the yeast that is used to ferment the wine.  Fruit and yeast combine during fermentation to produce aroma and flavor or sense of taste.  The third influence upon the wine in your glass may be the oak barrel that the wine was aged in.  Some varietals of white wine are fermented and aged in steel; in this case there is no oak influence to the sense of taste or aroma.

Red wine and some varietals of white wine like Chardonnay spend more time in oak barrels.  Red wines in particular benefit from barrel aging. During fermentation red wines get their color from the skin of the grape. Tannin occurs as a result of grapes and their skins soaking together during the fermentation process.  Barrel aging allows the red wines to develop depth of color and refine or settle tannin which is the grittiness you experience when drinking a red wine.  Different varietals produce different amounts of tannin.  For example Pinot Noir will express less tannin than Cabernet Sauvignon.

Fruit, yeast and wood produce aroma, flavor, and tactile sensation when you drink wine.  Your palate can sense four different tastes – sweet, bitter, salty and sour.  The mouth can also “feel” cool, warm, dryness, tingling, a coating feeling, and a feeling of numbness.

Sweetness is perceived immediately when you taste a wine as this area is located right on the tip of your tongue.  Acidity in a wine is recognized in the cheek, on the sides of the tongue, which is the area that senses “sour” flavors, and also in the back of the throat.  Lighter red wines and white wines generally have a higher degree of acidity.

 

Riedel Bordeaux wine glass

The middle of the tongue is the area that recognizes anything salty.  In the case of wine, this is where tannin, which is a tactile sensation, is felt.  When wines are young the tannins are what make a wine present as too dry.

Fruit and its individual varietal characteristics are smells not tastes.  But the weight of the wines fruit will be felt on the middle of your tongue.  This is why wines are referred to as light, medium, or full bodied.

The aftertaste, or finish of a wine is what happens when you actually swallow. In a good wine, this is a very pleasing sensation with all components of a wine coming together in harmony and balance.

So why is the glassware such an important companion to good wine?  The Riedel Company has designed a wine delivery system, the wine glass, which is varietal specific.  The Riedel wine glass presents the aroma and the taste of wine perfectly.  Form versus function is not so much a term that describes conflict but better describes the intersection of form and function united for a single purpose.  This is exactly what a Riedel wine glass delivers to our nose and our palate.  A varietal correct wine glass from the Riedel Company has the ability to make $10 wine taste like $100 wine.

Riedel wine glasses receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™ and are available at Liquid Planet located in the heart of Downtown Missoula. For more information www.WineGuyMike.wordpress.com or Facebook at WineGuyMike

‘Cariblanco’ Sauvignon Blanc was named for a white faced horse

‘Tobiano’ Pinot Noir, was a painted horse that looked as if someone poured two cans of paint on him

Lucero’ Syrah, a horse with an intense white flash on his forehead

The Kingston fine wine selections are available especially priced at Liquid Planet, Missoula’s “Best of Beverage”, located in the Heart of Downtown Missoula.

The wines reviewed today all receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™

You can listen to the show live on the Trail 103.3FM or U 104.5FM.  These shows are podcast for your convenience and available on my blog at; www.WineGuyMike.wordpress.com or visit the new website at www.wineguymike.com (coming soon).

From my table to yours,

"from my table to yours"

This Week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© Kingston Family Vineyards from Casablanca Valley Chile


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and U 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast with Courtney Kingston of Kingston Family Vineyards; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/09/15/wine-guy-mike-for-september-16/

YouTube preview for this week’s show with Kingston Family Vineyards;

Recent Podcast with head winemaker of Balletto Vineyards & Winery, Mr. Anthony Beckman; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/07/29/wine-guy-mike-for-july-29/

Recent week’s podcast; What You Need To Know About Wine  http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/07/15/wine-guy-mike-for-july-15/

Recent podcast; (full length conversation) with Maximilian Riedel, CEO Riedel Crystal of America http://trail1033.podbean.com/2012/06/24/wine-guy-mike-for-june-24/

NBC Montana Today TV Segment; Perfect Patio Wines and food pairing; http://www.nbcmontana.com/news/Mike-Tornatore-8-7-12/-/14594602/15999458/-/67a5ri/-/index.html

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link:

http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sleep City Missoula  www.SleepCity.com

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana

Welcome to Kingston Family Vineyards

Welcome to Kingston Family Vineyards

Carl John Kingston was a miner and engineer from Central Mine, Michigan.  In 1906 Kingston set out for Chile and joined the Cerro de Pasco Mining Company.  Kingston never struck gold but he married Caroline Los Kamp and settled on “The Farm”.  Kingston wound up with the land known as “The Farm” as a result of one of his many mining deals. The land was a large dairy farm and cattle ranch situated 12 miles from the Pacific Ocean and nestled in the western hills of the Casablanca Valley in Chile.

Courtney Kingston

In today’s modern era most farms are not sustainable for more than three generations.  Courtney formulated a plan of sustainability during her graduate studies at Stanford.  She wrote a business plan that incorporated growing high quality grapes on the Kingston family’s cattle ranch and dairy farm.

The ‘casa patronal’ or Kingston Family home. This is traditional architecture for coastal Chile from the late 1880’s

Inspired by California vineyard visionaries, David Hirsch and Gary Pisoni, Courtney’s plan called for planting pinot noir and syrah grape vines in an area known only for white grape cultivation.  The Kingston family’s mission was to grow world class quality red grapes in a cool weather climatic zone.  In 1998 pinot noir and syrah grape vines were planted on the western hills of the Kingston’s Casablanca Valley farm.

The Kingston family led by Courtney’s plan harvested their first grapes in 2003, the result was 400 cases of pinot noir and syrah. Under the watchful eye of the Kingston family and two amazing winemakers, Byron Kosuge and Evelyn Vidal, Kingston Family Vineyards produce one of the best values in wine today.  Their portfolio of wines feature Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir, and Syrah.  All of the wines are named for horses on “The Farm”.

‘Cariblanco’ Sauvignon Blanc was named for a white faced horse

‘Tobiano’ Pinot Noir, was a painted horse that looked as if someone poured two cans of paint on him

Lucero’ Syrah, a horse with an intense white flash on his forehead

The Kingston fine wine selections are available especially priced at Liquid Planet, Missoula’s “Best of Beverage”, located in the Heart of Downtown Missoula.

The wines reviewed today all receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™

You can listen to the show live on the Trail 103.3FM or U 104.5FM.  These shows are podcast for your convenience and available on my blog at; www.WineGuyMike.wordpress.com or visit the new website at www.wineguymike.com (live 9/20/2012)

From my table to yours,

"from my table to yours"

“A Tale of Terroir” this week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/09/25/wine-guy-mike-for-september-25th/

 My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhee

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at http://www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show; “The Tale of Two Terroir’s.”  There are two countries from South America that produce exceptional wine of value.  Chile and Argentina are known by wine lovers from around the world to produce great wine that’s affordable.  These two countries run parallel to one another yet produce very different styles of wine, but make no mistake there are great wines being produced in Chile and Argentina and I have two that I enjoy and will share with you.

In the world of wine you will see the word terroir used when writers are describing wine, vineyards, or perhaps well-known wine regions in general.  Simply stated terroir defines a sense of place.  When a winemaker talks about their wine and refers to terroir they are suggesting that the wine expresses the personality of the earth, the weather that influences grapes in a vineyard, subtle yet unique nuances imparted as a result of terroir.  These subtleties may exist  only in one small block of land. 

Napa Valley’s most famous vineyard To Kalon is a perfect example.  To Kalon is Ancient Greek for “the highest beauty”, this vineyard  provides Robert Mondavi Winery with most of the grapes for its world-class Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve,  and is the exclusive source of Sauvignon Blanc.  You begin to realize just how romantic and powerful this term “terroir” becomes as your personal relationship with wine evolves.   

The Colchagua Valley of Chile is on the west coast of South America and enjoys a Mediterranean climate that is somewhat unique when it comes to wine country terroir.  Chile is a melting pot of European influence that runs north to south on the West Coast of South America and is 2,600 miles in length, but it is only 100 miles wide at its widest point.  There is a heavy influence of German, Spanish, English, and French that have taken up residence and enjoy this wonderful Mediterranean climate.

The Colchagua Valley wine region has four clearly defined seasons which is rare and exists at only four other points around the world: the Mediterranean coast; the California coast; the Cape of Good Hope; and the southeast coast of Australia. The climate in Chile falls somewhere in between that of California and Bordeaux.  Rich aroma and flavor in the wines of this valley are the result of Pacific maritime influence and breezes from the Andes Mountain slopes that move through the vineyards.

Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, and Carmenère are the most widely planted red grape varietals in the Colchagua Valley.  In 1996 Chile exported 100,000 cases of wine to the United States and today that number has increased to 7 million cases. The quality and value of wines from Chile speaks for itself which is duly noted by the increased exports.

Chilean wines adhere to the European Union label requirements.  The wine must contain 85% of the grape variety, vintage, and domaine of origin (D.O.) that are indicated on the label.

Argentina is the largest wine-producing country of South American and the fifth largest producing country in the world.  With 300 days of sunshine and an average of only 8 inches of rain each year the Argentinians have established an elaborate irrigation system fed by runoff from the snow-capped Andes Mountains.

The Jesuit missionaries began making wine in the mid-fifteen century in the Mendoza region of Argentina.  The Uco Valley (pronounced ooko) of Mendoza produces mainly Malbec, Tempranillo, and Cabernet Sauvignon.  Argentina is widely recognized throughout the world for their outstanding Malbec wines that offer a real bargain for the wine consumer.  The Mendoza region has over 70% of the total 500,000 vineyard acres planted in all of Argentina.  There are over 600 vineyards located in Mendoza. 

The grapes in this Mendoza region are planted at high altitude near the base of the Andes Mountains.  With hot days, cool nights, and breezes from the mountains producing beautiful fruit that is concentrated and naturally acidic.  The result is excellent wine that is balanced and well structured.

When you read the label on the bottle of Argentinean Wine the grape that is listed is 100% of that varietal.  The Malbec wines from this region offer tremendous single varietal focus and in the hands of a great winemaker will leave you with a memorable finish on your palate and in your mind.

In tasting both the 2009 Quatro blend and 2009 Killka Malbec wines you will discern a very distinct style of winemaking.   The difference in these two wines is very representative of Chilean and Argentinean wines.  Chilean wines have a tendency toward big, rich, full-bodied wines whereas Argentinean wines typically are concentrated, focused, and a bit less refined. 

Here are two outstanding examples of South American wines of exceptional value.  The first is a Chilean red blend from Viña MontGras; the 2009 MontGras Quatro is a blend of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Malbec; 15% Carmenère, and 15% Syrah.  This wine is a deep ruby color in the glass and on the nose offers aromas of fresh-roasted coffee, dark fruit of black currants and cherries, leather with a hint of vanilla.  When you smell this you know you want to taste it, and you won’t be disappointed.

This wine on the palate is full-bodied, rich, soft, supple, and round.  There is a very nice balance of fruit and acid which allows it to pair well with food.  This wine is not so big and over extracted that it will over power you or your food pairing.  The Quatro serves up a long, luscious, and lingering finish.  This wine is under $15.00.  Pair this wine with grilled Top Sirloin or Prime Rib.

The Argentinean wine from Mendoza that offers tremendous value is 2009 Salentine “Killka” Malbec.  This wine is flamboyant, fruit forward, spicy and perfectly tannic.  In your glass the wine has a deep purple hue with darker  streaks of purple when held up to the light.  Dark plum and blackberry with a bit of sweet vanilla meet the nose.  This wine has great fruit, balance, and structure on the palate.  Don’t forget about the wonderful silky tannins this wine offers.  The Killka has not been overly manipulated in the winemaking process and this is one of its best qualities.  Available for under $15.00.  Pair this wine with Rib Eye or Filet Mignon and a red wine reduction or green peppercorn sauce.

Both wines receive the WineGuyMike™ seal of approval®

Cin Cin

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

The wine is in your glass now what do you do with it? Tasting wine with WineGuyMike


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© on both radio stations on Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Each week WineGuyMike™  will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links; see this week’s show on YouTube  each week on Sunday morning.  My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors                                                                                                                     

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

This week’s WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© Topic; Wine and Cheese, we’re talking about a old world medium bodied red wine and a crisp, dry, new world white varietal wine that pair well with the cheese we are enjoying on the show this morning.

Old World wines from Europe typically dictate the type of grapes grown, how the wines are made and in some cases the amount of grapes harvested.  A New World wine that is not from Europe is typically defined by geographic areas but do not interfere with grape growing, picking, or wine making.  Now this is an entire study unto itself but this is the much abbreviated version.

 Boroli “Quattro Fratelli” 2007 Barbera $14.00-$16.00 –  from Piedmont, Italy – this is a great  transitional wine, stepping out from new to old world for the adventurous palette looking to broaden their wine horizons from perhaps a Merlot or Zinfandel.  This wine typically scores in 90 point range on a scale of 100.

Boroli "Quattro Fratelli" 2007 Barbera

Boroli "Quattro Fratelli" 2007 Barbera

Barbera is a red grape variety of Piedmont origin which has seen great results in the past twenty years, becoming a favorite of wine lovers all the world over.  The Boroli Barbera grapes come from vineyards in the area of Alba, with a south-east and east exposition.
The vines are trained in the guyot method and are planted at a density of 4,000 plants per hectare.  Moderately aged, the wine is harmonious and fruity, an easy drinking wine.
“Quattro Fratelli” refers to the four Boroli brothers, and was named by Achille Boroli, the third of the four brothers!

The color of Boroli “Quattro Fratelli” is a very intense, ruby red.  On the nose it offers aromas of ripe forest fruits and undertones of vanilla.  While on the palate this wine is close-texture, mouth-filling with aromas of ripe raspberries and blackberries.
There is a nice balance of fruit, acidity, and tannins for followed by a long-appealing finish.  This wine was barrel aged for 6 months and bottle aged for 6 months.  This wine is great to drink now but will also improve with 2-4 years of aging.

The Quattro Fratelli pairs perfect with pasta dishes, meat, sausage sauces, red meat, braised, stewed, or lamb on the spit.  It is also ideal with medium ripe, highly-flavored cheeses, such as hard Bra cheese, Grana Padano, Monte Veronese and cheeses from the South of Italy.

Mont Gras Reserva 2009 Sauvignon Blanc $10.00-$11.00 – This is a great value wine from Chile.  Sauvignon Blanc from Chile is as good an example of the best the Sauvignon Blanc varietal has to offer from the new world of wines.  The Mont Gras has great balance of citrus fruits(lime), tropical(passion fruit), green apple, and hints of Jalapenos.  This wonderful wine is pale straw in color and typical to a new world Sauvignon Blanc this wine has been aged in steel barrels to preserve the fruit and crispness of the wine.  This is a wine that is easy to love because it drinks so beautifully.   Sauvignon Blanc weather is on its way, Punxsutawney Phil told me so and mentioned this great all around food friendly wine that I’m recommending for you today.

Mont Gras Reserva 2009 Sauvignon Blanc

Mont Gras Reserva 2009 Sauvignon Blanc

WineGuyMike wants to share his two favorite cheeses from The Rogue Creamery, Caveman Blue and the Rogue Creamery Smoked Blue.  If you’re a blue cheese fan these are some of the finest in the world.  The Caveman Blue is different than many blue cheeses as it is soft, almost spreadable, but has a slight grittiness, pungent(in a great way), and beautiful in your mouth.  It has nuances of beef and bacon & grass and hay, and is firm & lower in moisture with a natural rind featuring extensive blue mold development Paired correctly it brings out the incredible nuances of the cheese and wine.

The Rogue Smoked Blue is also one of my favorites, this is firmer in texture compared to the Caveman but is no less interesting.  It is a great blue with a strong but with an ever so nice smoked nuance.  I love this cheese with sliced Braburn apples and wine, wow now that’s a meal unto itself.

WineGuyMike™ wine recommendations to go with these great Rogue Creamery Cheeses.

I chose two wines today to share with you because they are wines that are readily accessible and offer the consumer great value.  These two wines taste great and paired with the two cheeses I’ve selected to share with you they bring out the very best in one another.  I give both of these wines The WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval©.

Now let’s get on with tasting today’s wines that I’ve recommended for you today.  Here is a very simple process for basic wine tasting I call the 5 sssss’s:

  1. Swirl – with your glass on the table or in your hand move the glass so the wine moves in a circular motion in your glass 
  2. Smell – stick your nose in the glass and think about the different aromas’ that you are able to discern
  3. Sight – hold the wine up toward light, what does it look like, color, viscosity, what do the individual streams of wine dribbling down the side of the glass look like
  4. Swill – take a small sip, pucker your lips and gently breath in
  5. Spit or Swallow – if you have a bucket spit, if not swallow

Getting oxygen to the wine brings out the bouquet and aroma in a wine, so swirl away.  Smelling the wine may be the most important part of tasting a wine.  Most people can recognize over two thousand scents.  Did you know that wine has over two hundred discernable scents of its own?  Examining wine held up to a light looking first from the bottom of the wine glass up into the wine will help you determine the color of the wine which also helps determine the “age” and “stage” of the wine you’re drinking. 

White wine colors to look for, young to older wine:

  1. Pale yellow – green
  2. Straw yellow
  3. Yellow – gold
  4. Gold
  5. Old gold
  6. Yellow brown
  7. Maderized
  8. Brown

Red wine colors to look for, young to older wine:

  1. Purple
  2. Ruby
  3. Red
  4. Brick red
  5. Red – brown
  6. Brown

Holding the wine at an angle look at the surface of the wine you’re drinking and examine the viscosity of the wine, which is what appears to be the layer of oil on the surface of the wine.  If it is thicker or heavier this denotes a wine that is fuller and will have a heavier, fuller mouthfeel.  That is the texture you actually feel of the wine in your mouth.  A wine with a less viscous surface you will note that is feels much thinner and lighter in your mouth.  The viscosity is also what causes the legs of the wine to run quickly or slowly down the inside of your glass after it has been swirled. 

Next take a small sip of wine and pucker your lips, then gently breathe in.   This aerates the wine in your mouth, even swish the wine around a bit.  This really brings the wine to life so you can experience everything the wine has to offer your palette that the winemaker intended you to sense in their wine that they have made for you.  We can sense four different tastes and possible five but that is still debatable, and they are;  sweet, bitter, salty, sour, and perhaps an ability to sense MSG otherwise known as umami.  Our mouth also has an ability to “feel” cool, warm, dryness, tingling, a coating feeling, and a feeling of numbness.  Wow there is much to think about when drinking wine isn’t there, just remember not to over think it, it was made to enjoy.

If a wine has been well made it will be like a great movie.  The memory or finish lingers, a cause to ponder and then lust for more.  You just had a great wine, cheers to you from WineGuyMike™.

Next step:

  1. What is your sense of the wine in your mouth
  2. What does the wine taste like
  3. What does the wine feel like in your mouth
  4. How does your mouth perceive the wine, all up front, in the middle, more in the back of your mouth
  5. Is there a lingering after taste

Last Step:

  1. This is where the brain, mouth, and eyes come together as one
  2. Your description of what your nose, mouth, and eyes just experienced
  3. How would you describe this, remember there is no right or wrong description this is your subjective experience

Try the cheese now and think about how you would now describe the wine, until next week…

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

Connoisseurs Classic, notes from an Epic Wine Evening #3


ClosApalta 2005  Wine of the Year  WS- 96
Nose: Warm ganache, mocha
Palate: Currant, fig paste, black licorice, cassis bush
Finish: Long, juicy, dark fruit, mineral

Casa Lapostolle's Clos Apalta 2005 from the Colchagua's Apalta Valley in Chile's Rapel Valley region

Casa Lapostolle's Clos Apalta 2005 from the Colchagua's Apalta Valley in Chile's Rapel Valley region

Casa Lapostolle has created a blend of Carmenère, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon from the estate’s oldest vines in Colchagua’s Apalta valley. Winemaker Jacques Begarie blended Petit Verdot for aroma and color, thus creating a rich, velvety  wine . The 2005 Clos Apalta will cellar well and is priced modestly considering it was awarded the #1 wine of the year.

This is a great wine for the near future, it was great to taste but really needs more time in a bottle.  I would recommend drinking this in 3 years.  From my table to yours.

WineGuyMike