What’s Your Wine Style? This Week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast;  will be posted as soon as it is available, thank you.

NBC Montana Today TV Segment with Christmas wines; http://www.nbcmontana.com/video/30063511/index.html

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

Sleep City Missoula  www.SleepCity.com

Liquid Planet “Best of Beverage” and a great place to find your holiday wine located in the heart of downtown Missoula.

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Good Sunday morning and welcome to the WineGuyMike Radio Show.  It’s 2012 and I’m ready to rock this year’s vintage with you.  Together we are going to take a new approach and a new look at great wines that I can’t wait to share with you.

Pick up your empty glass and hold it up to the sky as you look out the window.  Imagine the beautiful color of your favorite wine adorning the glass, bend your elbow and pull the glass close and tip your nose deep into the glass.  Breathe deeply and imagine the wildest exotic aromas of your favorite wine rising from the juice in your glass.  Lower the glass to your lips, tilt your head gently back and take an imaginary sip of the finest wine you have ever tasted.  Swish the wine all about as it invigorates your palate.  Swallow the liquid nectar and imagine The Trail that it has left behind, the finish of the best wine you have ever tasted.  It lingers on your palate just like a song you hear on the radio and then it is stuck in your head.  You play it over and over, on your palate and in your mind.

That’s right this I’m going to take you on a new virtual wine journey week after week in 2012.  We are going to meet interesting new people from the vast world of wine.  Virtually traveling to new places we have yet to visit, experiencing wine in a way you and I have never imagined.  

Welcome to 2012.  Today I’m going to talk about style, your wine style preference is what I’m referring to.  So far this winter Western Montana has been a little bit strange.  Why you ask, well it has in the high 30’s to low 50’s and the last time I checked it is early January.  As memory serves me it is usually about zeroish this time of year in the Rocky Mountains.  This is more than a little disconcerting, it is just downright unusual.

Did you know that all throughout the decade of the 60’s that grape farmers in Burgundy, France harvested their grapes on average at the end of September?  In the first few years of the millennium that harvest took place in the first week of September.  I don’t begin to know what that means but it is a huge change.  When I think about having Spring in the middle of Winter in the Rocky Mountains and major climate changes in wine country around the world it is one of those circumstances that make me go hmm……………..

Old World, New World, what’s your style?  Let’s take a closer look and see if we can define this.  First of all let’s consider these terms; Old World wine, Old World winemaking, New World wine, and New World winemaking.  What do these terms mean and why are they relevant?

When I think about terminology that best describes Old World vs. New World these are a few thoughts that come to mind.

Old World; Ancient, Europe, tried, apprenticeships, craftsman, details, tradition, experience, patience, aged, practical, these are my thoughts when I think of Old World.

New World; Young, new, melting pot, now, in the moment, technology, science, instant gratification, excess, impatient, brash, learn as I go, these are a few terms that come to mind when I think of New World.

I’m not suggesting that one is better that the other, what I am suggesting is that when it comes to wine, these are styles.  Styles should be considered for the situation, perhaps a style to suite your mood, or your frame of mind.

For me Old World vs. New World could be compared to the difference between those who cook with feel and experience and those who cook with recipes.  Old World draws on centuries of experience thus allowing for intuitive multi-dimensional winemaking.   New World has decades of experience, it may still be developing its formula, striving to become more dimensional.  Experience enables chef’s to create and cook with intuition; the same can be said for winemakers as well.

Winemakers from the Old World are very much in the background.  Current winemakers are a result of many years of understudy and apprenticeship with the winemaker who made wines at that particular Chateau or Estate. Rarely do you know the name of a famous Old World winemaker, but it is common to be aware of a famous Chateau or Estate that produces excellent wine.  This is because European wine laws typically dictate what grapes can be grown, how much of them can be grown, harvested, and dictate how the wines are made.  Wine regions of the Old World have be growing grapes and making wine for centuries.  The New World does not yet have this type of experience to draw from.  The Old World quite literally has this down to a formula and they understand their terroir, or sense of place.

Let’s remember that Old World wine is made by design, it is made to complement foods that are indigenous to that particular region.  These wines are blends of grapes that are smooth and easy to drink and are easily enjoyed with foods they are designed to pair with.  Old World wines exude restraint but express subtle nuances of sense of place, are understated yet complex, these are sophisticated wines that present as simple.

Wine in the New World in the most historic sense may only be a century old.  Cavalier vineyard owners and young winemakers are still discovering new places to grow grapes as they understand terrior.  Historic floods, fossils, seismic activities, and cataclysmic eruptions up and down the west coasts of North and South America are now the home of multitudes of renowned vineyards with serious potential.

If you look closely at the pedigrees of New World winemakers almost all have wine related degrees of Enology or Viticulture from UC Davis or Oregon State.  What does this mean for you and me?  Most new young winemakers have these degrees prior to having the opportunity to utilize their specialties at a wine estate. This is unlike the Old World that is steeped in the tradition of apprenticeship.  New World winemaking comes at wine from a very different direction than Old World in some respects and I believe it is reflected in the wine, not that this is bad, it is just different. 

New World wines are not made as a result of foods indigenous to regions.  These wines are driven by science and now are also by an understanding of the terroir.  Vineyard owners and winemakers understand terroir now in a way the Old World has for centuries.  So how are the wines different, well to start with most New World wines are single varietal wines, although many winemakers that are beginning to blend wines well.  Most New World wine has a much higher percentage of alcohol than Old World wine.  This presents wines that are much bigger, much bolder than their European counterparts.  In general most New World wines are designed to drink and not necessarily made with a food pairing purpose in mind.  That is not to say New World wines do not pair well with food, they are not made to complement food localized to a region.

I find that New World wines have a much sturdier frame or structure, are much more pronounced visually, aromatically, and certainly on the palate.  This is the New World style of wine, is this better, less than, no they really cannot be compared because they are simply different.   As for me it really comes down to what is the circumstance and what kind of mood I’m in.  Do you want wine to enjoy dinner with or do I want to sip on wine to be social, a lot to consider.  New World and Old World alike both produce wonderful wines, but perhaps with a different focus.

2009 “In the Rocks” Syrah from Reynvaan Family Vineyards

This is an example of an Old World style of wine made by Matt Reynvaan who last year was noted as one of the top 30 winemakers under 30 years of age in the world.  Nobody does wine better that Reynvaan Vineyards from Walla Walla in the Columbia Valley AVA.

The 2009 “In The Rocks” is packed with dark fruit aromatics, smoked meats, crushed gravel, and white pepper.  It is very animalistic with hints of sweet creme brulee and will benefit from 5 years of cellaring if you are able to resist the temptation to drink it.  Terroir driven wine that is outstanding, you don’t want to miss this.  Check this wine out at Liquid Planet in the heart of Downtown Missoula.

2009 Truchard Vineyards Syrah from Carneros Napa Valley

The 2009 vintage produced fruity wines with intense flavors, great texture, and beautiful balance.  This terrific example of a New World style of wine from the Carneros area in the Napa Valley has aromas of plum, boysenberry, and blackberry; highlighted with vanilla, earth, and white pepper.  On the palate this wine is fills your mouth with rich flavors of cassis and black cherry; followed by mineral and cracked black pepper.  Ripe tannins provide an opulent, long finish of fruit and spice.  This wine is well made and a beautiful wine to drink.

*Both of these wines are upscale wines that represent the Old World vs. New World styles reffered to in today’s blog.  There will be selections of both styles available at  your favorite place to shop for affordable wines too.

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

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Riedel Wine Glasses, A Wine Delivery System by Design this week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links:

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/11/13/wine-guy-mike-for-november-13/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors     

 

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

Liquid Planet, “Best of Beverage”, located in Downtown Missoula www.LiquidPlanet.com

Sleep City Missoula , “Giving A Good Night’s Sleep To Those In Need” 2401 North Reserve Street www.SleepCity.com

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Good Sunday morning and welcome to the WineGuyMike radio show.  I recently had the pleasure of attending a stemware demonstration with Maximillian Riedel.  The Riedel Wine Glass Company has been making wine glasses for 300 years and Maximilian Riedel is the 11th generation family member representing their wine glass company.

I personally have used Riedel stemware for 20 years to enjoy, savor, and taste wines.  After two decades of experience and familiarity with a product one would “assume” the knowledge gained by use or consumption of a product that you might qualify as somewhat of an expert.  Boy was I wrong, ouch, humbled once again.

I have studied wine nearly my entire life but the 90 minutes I spent in the wine glass demonstration with Maximilian was not only the best presentation I have ever attended, but also the most compelling.  This demonstration truly stirred my wine soul.  If you ever have the opportunity to attend a Riedel Wine Glass demonstration please do not miss it.

We have all heard the term “form versus function”, for the Riedel Wine Glass Company it is all about form and function.  I’ll get back to this point but first I would like to share a few insights about wine.

When we open a bottle of wine to let it breath, decant, or aerate the wine with one of the devices that have been developed to enhance our wine experience.  Oxygen “opens up” wine and brings out the aroma of the wine.

There are 2-3 elements of wine that create aroma and flavor.  The first one of these elements is the fruit.  The second element is the yeast that is used to ferment the wine.  Whether the winemaker uses a natural or commercial strain of yeast the fruit and yeast combine during fermentation to produce aroma and flavor or sense of taste.  The third influence upon the wine in your glass may be the oak barrel that the wine was aged in.  Some varietals of white wine are fermented and aged in steel, in this case there is no oak influence to the sense of taste or aroma.  Many white wines today are fermented and aged in steel tanks with some or all of the white wine spending a brief amount of time in oak barrels.  This will influence the taste and aroma of a wine.  Today’s trend though, “Oak is Out”.  Most white wine styles today are trending towards crisp, bright fruit in white wines.

Red wine and some varietals of white wine like Chardonnay spend more time in oak barrels.  Red wines in particular benefit from barrel aging. During fermentation red wines get their color from the skin of the grape. Tannin occurs as a result of grapes and their skins soaking together during the fermentation process.  Barrel aging allows the red wines to develop depth of color and refine or settle tannin which is the grittiness you experience when drinking a red wine.  Different varietals produce different amounts of tannin.  For example Pinot Noir will express less tannin than Cabernet Sauvignon.

So we know fruit, yeast and wood produce aroma, flavor, and tactile sensation when you drink wine.  Your palate or more commonly known as the tongue can sense four different tastes and possibly five.  Our sense of tastes are;  sweet, bitter, salty, sour, and perhaps an ability to sense MSG otherwise known as umami.  The mouth also has the ability to “feel” cool, warm, dryness, tingling, a coating feeling, and a feeling of numbness.

Sweetness is perceived immediately when you taste a wine as this area is located right on the tip of your tongue.  Acidity in a wine is recognized in the cheek area, on the sides of the tongue which is the area that senses “sour” flavors, and then also in the back of the throat.  Lighter red wines and white wines generally have a higher degree of acidity.

The middle of the tongue is the area that recognizes anything salty.  In the case of wine this is where tannin which is a tactile sensation, not a flavor, is felt.  When wines are young the tannins are what make a wine present as too dry.

Fruit and its individual varietal characteristics are smells not tastes.  But the weight of the wines fruit will be felt on the middle of your tongue.  This is why  wines are referred to as light, medium, or full bodied.

The aftertaste or what is referred to as the finish of a wine is what happens when you actually swallow wine.  In a good wine this is a very pleasing sensation as all of the components of a wine come together in harmony and balance then linger in your mouth and mind.

So why is the glassware such an important companion to good wine?  The Riedel Wine Glass Company has designed a wine delivery system, the wine glass, which is varietal specific.  The Riedel wine glass presents the aroma and the taste of wine perfectly.  Form versus function is not so much a term that describes conflict but better describes the intersection of form and function united for a best purpose.  This is exactly what a Riedel wine glass delivers to our nose and our palate.  A varietal correct wine glass from the Riedel Wine Glass Company has the ability to make 10 dollar wine taste like 100 dollar wine. 

Prior to setting in on the stemware demonstration with Maximilian I was very much of the mindset that great stemware was reserved for expensive wine.  Most of us may enjoy a daily glass of wine; this is what I refer to as a daily drinker, a bottle of wine for twelve dollars or under.  The right wine glass will really enhance an affordable wine.

I’m going to share pictures of five Riedel wine glasses that you must have.  Once you have tasted wine from a Riedel wine glass you will understand that these varietal specific wine glasses accomplish three things.  First the glass holds the wine within the shape of the varietal specific body of the glass.  Due to the quality and shape of the glasses it is very easy to visually examine your wine.  The opening or rim of each specific glass allows aroma from the wine to be revealed, and enjoyed.  The glass allows a person to discern the aromatics of a wine.  Secondly the Riedel wine glasses target and direct wine onto the correct area of the palate.  This is also specific to each varietal of wine, for instance drinking wine from the Riesling/Sauvignon Blanc glass is delivered directly to the tip of the tongue where it is best recognized for its varietal nuances.  If you are drinking a big Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley the Riedel wine glass delivers this wine onto the mid to back palate where the nuances of this varietal are best distinguished.

The pictures that I share visually demonstrate how the trajectory of wine will be delivered to the palate.  It is important to note the shape or pattern of wine as it lies in the body of a glass that is held at an angle.  I have tipped the glass and allowed the wine to flow to the rim of the glass.  Notice how the wine spreads both vertically and horizontally in the glass once it has been tipped.

The first glass is Riedel’s Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc glass, notice the wine as I hold the glass at an angle and allow the wine to flow to the lip of the glass.  This is how this wine will be trajected onto your palate.  You can see this wine will hit the palate right up front.  This allows the palate to enjoy the sweetness of the fruit on the tip of the tongue.

Riedel Riesling & Sauvignon Blanc Wine Glass

Riedel Riesling & Sauvignon Blanc Wine Glass

The diamond shape you see in the newest Riedel Chardonnay wine glass is truly reflective of today’s style of Chardonnay as demanded by consumers.  At most gatherings you taste wine at you will often hear comments from wine drinkers that they no longer desire heavy handed oak in their Chardonnay.  Riedel has responded to the consumer by designing a glass that is diamond shaped.  Many Chardonnay wines now have much more influence from cold fermentation.  The result is a Chardonnay wine that is bright with fruit and acidity.  The new style of Chardonnay may be aged in a combination of steel tanks and oak barrels.  Chardonnay is a full body white wine whereas a Sauvignon Blanc or Riesling are much lighter in body and are non-oaked in flavor and style.  When you examine both pictures that I have shared with you it is very easy to see the pattern of wine that will be transferred onto the palate is very different.  The diamond shape glass focuses the bright, and bigger fruit aroma to the nose while the pattern of wine that flows to the palate is broad.  This is in direct comparison to what is delivered by the Riesling style glass.  Once again Chardonnay is a fuller fruit that typically has some influence from oak aging.  This will vary depending on the style dictated by winemakers.  The dry nature of the Chardonnay grape combined with a slight nuance of tannin from oak aging is delivered mid-palate.  Wine delivery by design, this is what Riedel has engineered into each and every wine glass.

Riedel's newest style Chardonnay Wine Glass

Riedel's newest style Chardonnay Wine GlassRiedel Pinot Noir Wine Glass

 Red wine glasses from Riedel.

Riedel Pinot Noir Wine Glass

Riedel Pinot Noir Wine Glass

The Riedel Pinot Noir glass as you will note in this picture delivers wine close to the tip of the tongue so that the sweetness of the fruit will be enjoyed. You will notice that the wine near the lip of the glass is not nearly as broad as the Sauvignon Blanc, thus the wine is projected just behind the tip of the tongue.   As you will also note that the pattern of the wine in the glass suggests that the wine will then spread to the mid-palate.  Remember that the fine tannin and acidity of the fruit will be recognized by the middle of the tongue and cheek areas of the mouth.  

Riedel Bordeaux Wine Glass

Riedel Bordeaux Wine Glass

Riedel’s Red Bordeaux glass and their newest large Bordeaux style glass which appears to be a Bordeaux style wine glass on steroids are great examples of form and function.  The new large red wine glass is designed to accommodate a new style or trend in red wines that are being produced in warmer climate zones like Napa Valley.  Some of these big powerful red wines have high alcohol content approaching fourteen percent with some even reaching 15%.  Riedel recognized that wines this big and powerful need a deep glass with a large body. Examine the different pattern that the wine forms within the glass as they are tipped at an angle. The Pinot Noir and Bordeaux style wines lie very differently within their respective glasses when tilted at an angle.

Large Riedel Red Wine Glass for big red's high in % of alcohol

Large Riedel Red Wine Glass for big red's high in % of alcohol

Perhaps one of the most important things to understand about the Riedel Wine Glass Company is that evolution of design never stops.  They currently are developing brand specific wine glasses for special wines from around the world.  They also recognize that styles and trends in wine and grape growing continues to change.  Viticulturists worldwide now understand that some grape varietals may be best suited to a valley, the hillside, or grow best on the hiltops.  Rest assured that The Riedel Wine Glass Company is paying attention and designing glasses for what is to come.

Try these two wines with your Thankgiving dinner, they will not disappoint.

2010 Russian River Valley Pinot Noir

Riedel's Pinot Noir and Champagne glass. That's right now recommended for Champagne too

Riedel's Pinot Noir and Champagne glass. That's right now recommended for Champagne too

This dark, garnet-colored Pinot Noir is floral with aromas of rose petals, spice, ginger, cassis and fruit aromas of raspberry.  There is a bit of dusty earth with just hint of vanilla too. This wine is showy with a seamless viscosity that is balanced with a healthy bit of tartness to keep the wine fresh and lively. It’s full in the palate with fine, coco-powder-like tannins.  A long beautiful finish.

Here is another wine that will pair nicely with a Thanksgiving meal and guests will certainly enjoy.  Both of these wines are available at Liquid Planet in Downtown Missoula. 

Gentil Hugel 2010

Riedel Riesling & Sauvignon Blanc Glass

Riedel Riesling & Sauvignon Blanc Glass

This white wine is a beautiful blend of the Noble grapes from the Alsace region in France. It displays a light youthful color in the glass and is ripe with floral, fruit.

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

“Wine for the Health of It©”with Montana Celebrity Jill Valley from KPAX-TV on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/10/02/wine-guy-mike-for-october-2nd/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at http://www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Jill Valley KPAX-TV Anchor

Jill Valley KPAX-TV Anchor

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© local Montana celebrity Jill Valley from KPAX-TV in Missoula joined me in the radio studio.  Jill has been Broadcaster of the Year six times now in Montana including this year’s award.  She will quickly tell you though her biggest victory has come as the result of her winning battle against breast cancer.  Jill recently posed a question to me about wine and with this being Breast Cancer Awareness Month I suggested she come into the radio studio, that is just what she did.

It was a real pleasure to have Jill as my featured guest this week.  It was very interesting to hear her story and she made my job easy, she is very good at her profession.  Jill is a mother and has one wonderful young daughter who is an ice skater.  Jill also skates as a hobby and claims to be a “bad skater”, but I have heard otherwise from Missoula’s top age group skating Coach Patty Koster.

Jill and I have discussed wine in the past and she came to me recently and asked if I was aware of any non-alcoholic wines that tasted good.  The long and short of it was, no I was not aware of any good non-alcoholic wines.  There may be some good ones out there but I am not experienced with any.  Over time it has occurred to me that I learn more from listening than I do from talking.  Jill has done her homework her and has sought out an answer to her own question. 

The following are a few excerpts from Jill’s guest blog post, http://wp.me/PFhHw-dC, based on her research of non-alcoholic wines that are drinkable:

I started investigating the non-alcoholic wine option because even one glass makes me feel hung over the next day. But I still enjoy the taste and ritual of wine. And non-alcoholic wine lets you blend into social or business situations where you don’t have to explain why you’re not drinking. So I thought I’d give it a try – Jill’s guest blog post, http://wp.me/PFhHw-dC

CVS pharmacy has a terrific wine selection but only had Fre’, a product made by Sutter wines. CVS stocks it next to the Reunite (on ice, that’s nice) and the other wines in the giant glass jugs with twist tops which should make anyone suspicious. It was $4.99 with a twist top and wasn’t that good. I tried it years before but thought maybe technology had moved this brand ahead. If you’re the kind of person who likes to mindlessly sip wine while reading a book, this would work. Although mindlessly drinking alcohol might point to a deeper issue but I’m not your mom….so – Jill’s guest blog post, http://wp.me/PFhHw-dC

As a Montana celebrity Jill is constantly involved in community causes and events where attendees drink wine.  Unfortunately for Jill she is plagued by headaches from drinking even one glass of wine.  Jill has been searching for a solution, she too would like to enjoy a glass of wine while attending and speaking at these events.

Reactions to wine are not uncommon for many people.  It is readily assumed that such reactions are due in part to an allergic reaction of sulfites which serve as a preservative in wine.  My research results suggested that those who may suffer from reactions to wine may lack a natural enzyme in their body that will not breakdown sulfites in the wine.

Sulfites or sulfur dioxide is a fruit preservative widely used in dried fruits as well as wine.  It is also produced by the human body at the level of about 1000 mg (milligrams) per day.  Food preserved with sulfites is generally not a problem unless you are deficient in the natural enzyme that breaks it down.  For those individuals, the additional sulfites from food can be a problem.

The levels in wine average 80 mg/liter, or about 10 mg in a typical glass of wine, with slightly higher amounts in white versus red.  Many case studies show reactions by sensitive patients to drinking wine with sulfites.

All wines contain sulfites.  Yeast naturally produces sulfites during fermentation so there is only a rare wine which contains none.

The US and Australia require a “sulfite” or “preservative 220” warning label.  Nearly all wine makers add sulfites, including imported wines.  Import wines contain sulfites, but they are not legally obligated to indicate this on their labels.  European wines contain an average of 80 mg/L sulfites just as US wines do.

There are a few (very few) wine makers who make wines without adding sulfites.  In the US, organic wine must be made without added sulfites.  These are unusual because the wine is very perishable and often have unusual aromas from the aldehydes that are normally made aroma-less by the sulfites.  Look for these wines at natural food stores.

*Aldehydes – Any of a class of highly reactive organic chemical compounds obtained by oxidation of primary alcohols, characterized by the common group CHO, and used in the manufacture of resins, dyes, and organic acids.

It is possible that eating food along with your wine may reduce the severity of a reaction.  My hypothesis is this; sulfites may not be the cause of wine induced headaches or generally not feeling well as Jill has mentioned.  I suspect that people who are deficient in the natural enzyme that breaks down sulfites can be the problem.  When ingesting additional sulfites a person may have a difficult time digesting the sulfite and hence “the reaction”.  It is interesting to note that anyone you talk to who suffers from such reactions vary from mild to severe.

If you are someone who suffers from this wine dilemma you should consult with your physician concerning this issue before drinking any wine

If your physician suggests that it would okay to try wine in moderation and according to the American Medical Associations guidelines I would suggest trying organic wine or an estate produced and bottled wine.  Typically the grapes in estate produced wines grown by conscientious farmers have been treated in a similar practice to that of organically grown grapes.  Many wineries have not gone through the process of being certified organic as it is a very arduous and expensive process.   Organic and Biodynamic Agriculture practices are on the rise as wineries realize the benefits of sustainable farming practices.

The other suggestion I may offer is to select an Old World Wine as they have a tendency to be lower in alcohol.  For instance Beaujolais is a great choice as these types of wine are light-bodied, fruity, fresh, and without an abundance of tannin.  While enjoying wine at lunch the French use sparkling mineral water to dilute their wine which greatly reduces the alcohol content. 

 This is a great solution for a person in a social situation who wants to enjoy a glass of wine with the rest of the crowd.  A glass of wine diluted by ½ or 2/3 sparking water still maintains a beautiful color in your glass.  The wine still provides the palate with a nice taste experience.  San Pellegrino is my favorite brand to use when mixing sparkling water with my wine.  Drink in moderation and good health and may we all raise a glass during Breast Cancer Awareness month in acknowledgement of our fellow wine lovers who have been touched by this illness.   

I want to personally thank my friend Jill Valley for taking time out to join me on the show this week.  She is a very brave, humble, and courageous woman who has survived her battle with cancer.  In wellness Jill is a crusader for the prevention and cure of this illness that has touched all of our lives.  Jill, cheers to you.

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

“Wine… it’s been berry berry good… to me,” Summer All Star lineup on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/09/04/wine-guy-mike-for-september-4th/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

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Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at http://www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© it occurred to me the holiday in America known as, “Labor Day,” is like a break that takes place with one of America’s favorite past times, Baseball and its All Star Break.  Now for those of you reading this that may not be familiar with Baseball, really, there is a break that takes place just after the mid-point of the season.  During this three day break, just like Labor Day weekend, the sport of baseball showcases its top athletes’ in an All Star Baseball game that the world can watch on Television.

Well this is that point of the wine season for me and I thought it would be nice to take a look back over the summer at some of the wines I have written about on my blog and talked about on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©.  This Labor Day weekend is really a turning point for wine drinkers, winemakers, and winery owners.  Wine drinkers like you and I will still enjoy our go to summer wines for another few weeks but then the season begins to change and so will the wines we choose to drink, it’s a natural evolution.  

Winery owners are beginning to think about the harvest.  They are considering what Mother Nature has given them in the way of weather in the spring and summer and what the harvest will produce.  The grapes have begun Veraison or the transition of growth into the ripening stage and everyone hopes for warm days, cool nights, and dry weather.  This is what produces good grapes at harvest.

Winemakers are pondering the timing, and weather of past seasons, reflecting on what the grapes have given them to work with from vintages past.  That is what they are beginning to think about as they sip on their glass of wine after a long days work in the vineyard for winemakers from smaller vineyards.  Larger operations may have many specialists, but for many vineyards they are farmers first and then transition after harvest into their true specialized rolls.

As I thought about all that I share with you today I really kept coming back to the parallel with baseball.  The season has changed and now we are entering the last trimester.  This is where it all counts, winding down the season and delivering the goods.

One of Saturday Night Lives’ best known sketches was about baseball and a certain character in particular.   In this comedic sketch Garrett Morris who portrayed the Dominican baseball player Chico Escuela, who spoke very disjointed English, delivered one of the best known catch phrases ever to a television audience; “Baseball… been berra berra good… to me.”

This week I give you my summer All Star lineup of wines.  The criteria for this lineup may exclude many of the great wines I have enjoyed this summer because the wines I share with you today must; affordable for the regular girl or guy, refreshing, easy to find, and go great with your Labor Day grillin’ and chillin’ get together with friends and family.  But I want to leave you with this parting thought; “Wine… it’s been berry berry good… to me™.”

A few Labor Day wine recommendations from WineGuyMike™:

Balletto 2008 Pinot Gris

One of my go to wines of the summe.  This pale-straw colored wine opens with musky and exotic fresh fig and floral honey tones.  The secondary aromas reveal ripe red apple, melon and lemon.  Altogether, these aromas are ever-changing and intoxicating.  In the mouth, it’s lush and perfectly viscous with a dose of tartness that balances and holds the wine together.

The fig and honey aromas make a secondary appearance in the finish to create a generous and incredibly long aftertaste that’s enhanced with a hint of butterscotch.

Lucien Albrecht Reserve Riesling

A beautiful French Riesling from the Alsace region of France.  This wine has a lovely nose that offers up both minerality and nice floral notes.  In the mouth this wine is both elegant and robust.  It has such great structure and being an Alsatian Riesling is beautifully dry and crisp.  Pair this with your seafood dishes this weekend.

Tuck Beckstoffer’s 75 Sauvignon Blanc

This wine presents as a classic Graves-style Sauvignon Blanc.  The light straw color is reminiscent of classic left-bank Bordeaux Blanc, while the flavors are a perfect blend of old-world complexity and crisp North Coast fruit.  The nose is just right on this gem, neither to fruity or grassy, but a nice aromatic of grass and grapefruit. On the palate this wine offers bright fruit flavors of apple skin and pear balanced by undertones of cherimoya, fig and melon.

This wine is the perfect pairing for soft cheeses, summer salads, grilled chicken and is one of my favorite domestic Sauvignon Blancs.

Vipra Bianca 2009

On the nose, this dry white wine expresses hints of fresh almonds, acacia, and citrus.  It is rich, yet fresh with a savory, elegant flavor.  This Italian white wine is a nice alternative to Sauvignon Blanc yet maintains a nice partnership with food because of the nice balance of fruit and acidity.

Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009

The Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009 is very well made.  This wine has wonderful tannin, is lush and full of its beautiful berry self.  It is a wonderfully balanced wine that will be so food friendly due to its fruit and acid companionship.  It doesn’t stop there though this wine for me delivers a great little nuance of toast and butter too.  It’s like a great mildly toasted piece of bread with homemade raspberry and cherry jam.  Serve this wine slightly chilled and pair it with everything from burgers, a nice grilled steak, or even a nice filet of grilled salmon.

Pennywise Pinot Noir

Light brick red in color with hints of emerald, the 2009 Pinot Noir blend of 94% Pinot Noir and 6% Syrah delivers aromas of cherries jubilee, root beer, rose petal, and cotton candy.  In the mouth this wine coats the palate with flavors of delicate plum, strawberry, watermelon rind, cream caramel, and vanilla bean.  The finish leaves you with delicate notes of fresh summer sweet strawberries.  Pair this wine with salads to pork chops or burgers, inexpensive and great to serve at a gathering.

Le Clos

This new wine, just released, is the latest addition to Domaine Sainte Eugénie.  It is unique in that it has a slight, refined oak character, highlighting a sturdy base of red fruit and oriental spices. Bringing into play terroir and savoir-faire, tradition and exotic flair, Le Clos seems to be like something out of “The Arabian Nights.”  This wine displays an attractive raspberry red color with hints of garnet.  Its nose is lively and complex, with notes of red and black fruits.  Refined oak fragrance (very subtle) with hints of incense, spices (nutmeg, clove, ginger), anise, autumn woods and tobacco.  Le Clos is very soft on the palate, with a fresh, tangy acidity, and delivers wonderful balance.  It is well-structured yet elegant, with fine tannins.  It will perfectly accompany a roast rack of lamb, barbecued beef or pork chops with fine herbs.

Rosenere Reggiano Lambrusco

Speaking of refreshing this sparkling gem from Italy was so nice to taste. The Rosenere immediately shows beautifully in the glass, a rich and lovely deep purple color with perfect frothy head. Remember this is what a good Lambrusco should have and even as this wine sits in between sips and you give it a swirl the nice frothy head returns immediately.

The nose on this beauty is equally as pleasing with notes of grape, raspberry, strawberry, and a little cherry. On the palate this wine is so tasty with nicely balanced fruit, acid, and tannin. The Rosenere Lambrusco is like an extra-dry Prosecco which means it is semi-dry and is slightly sweet. The sweetness is appropriate and not annoying in any way.  It just feels right in your mouth, and it is.  The finish leaves you with a delightful lingering memory of refreshing fruit.

This fun frizzante sparkler is nice to pair with rich dishes you may serving or is perfect to enjoy with a nice wedge of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese as an appetizer.

The Sum

 The inaugural vintage of The Sum is a cabernet based blended red wine created by Tuck Beckstoffer whose family is widely considered to be the most famous grape growing family in the Napa Valley.

This amazingly well endowed profoundly rich red wine must be smelled and tasted to be believed.  The color is a rich, deep purple garnet and gives but a small hint as to what’s inside. The nose gives off soaring and wonderfully focused aromas of ripe stone fruit, vanilla, cherries, cedar cigar box, blackberries and cinnamon.  In the mouth, there are layers upon layers of broad, sweet opulent fruit balanced by firm tannins, great acidity and oak. 

This wine is amazing and offers huge value, just one word on pairing with this bad boy from Tuck; Steak, steak and more steak.  I recommend firing up your grill now because this wine at this price point will blow you away.

Saracco Moscato d’Asti 2008 D.O.C.G.

A fabulous way to end the day with this beautiful wine that offers a perfume of fresh peach, pear and aromatic white flowers.  A gentle sparkle brightens the fruit and a tingle of sweetness hints of candied fruits.  This wine is perfect as refreshing aperitif or a light finish to a meal.  Moscato d’ Asti is highly aromatic with notes of fruit and white flowers, Paolo Saracco keeps tight control of the harvest to ensure a perfect acid balance to the natural sweetness of this grape.   A slight sparkle is traditional for Moscato d’Asti, it lifts the fruit and guarantees a wine that is light and refreshing.  It is your dessert in a glass, everyone loves this wine.

My favorite summer recipe from WineGuyMike™:

Start with a very hot grill and a nice New York Strip Steak.

Sear on both sides for 2-3 minutes.

Kill the heat and let the steak hangout in the grill at 200 degrees

Saute sweet onions with a finely sliced mixture of peppers from mildly to fairly hot.

Your steaks should be between medium rare and medium at this point.

Plate steaks and your onion and pepper sauté right on top.  This dish has incredible flavor with just a hint of sweetness and heat from the sauté.

Pair that with The Sum I have recommended in my summer All Star wine lineup and you are in heaven.

Have a wonderful Labor Day celebration; I’ve enjoyed sharing some of my summer favorites and this recipe with you.  Salute!

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

Burgers and Beaujolais on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

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Sponsors

      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© I’m pleased to a flight of three Beaujolais wines that are exceptional.  These wines really define what the show is all about, value, budget, and wines that are just downright great to drink. 

I love to share wine with friends and recently I sat down with my neighbors Ken and Cathy, and my journalism intern Andy for a virtual Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais wine tasting hosted by my friends from W.J. Deutsch & Sons and WineTwits.com., and Chef Bob Waggoner of UCook with Chef Bob on PBS television.  Chef Bob was nice enough to share his burgers with us today.  Please check out Chef Bob’s website at www.Ucookwithchefbob.com

You might ask what is a virtual wine tasting.  Let me see if I can if I can succinctly share with you what a virtual wine tasting is, so here we go.  In this case my friend Steve Gilberg from New York who is founder of WineTwits.com Steve has built a sharing platform that allows him to broadcast streaming video via the internet.  Then through the use of Twitter Steve creates an event by using a Hashtag as it is know which is the # with no space afterword and then the use of the keyword.  For the Burger and Beaujolais event Steve chose the Hashtag; #GDandBurgers.  Now what you have is live streaming comments via Twitter and live streaming video via WineTwits.com and voile you now have a virtual wine tasting event seen around the world in real time.  W.J. Deutsch & Sons provided the wines for this particular event, they have a outstanding portfolio of wines that they distribute so that you and I as a consumer have the opportunity to purchase outstanding wine at fair prices, or in this case the wines I’m sharing with you today are wines that offer extreme value.  You just won’t believe the prices of these wines and how great they are, my neighbors Ken and Cathy were just blown away by these wines.  Ken and Cathy are very knowledgeable wine consumers who drink primarily west coast produced wines.  They were very surprised with the wines we had at our #GDandBurgers virtual wine tasting.

Let me share some background about Burgundy, France which is where the Beaujolais wines are grown and produced.  Beaujolais is a province within Burgundy but produces wine distinct enough that it is considered its own area within Burgundy.  It is controlled by French wine law known as AOC.  When you purchase a bottle of these wonderful wines you will see this designation on the bottles label.  This French  wine law, Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée, gives the governing body the control to dictate these various issues; how many grapes can be grown in a designated area or a particular vineyard, how the grapes are harvested, how they are handled once they are harvested, most definitely the type of grapes grown in an area or region, how the wines are made, and how the wines are aged.  Now AOC laws throughout French wine country vary widely from one another based on what the French understand based on centuries of experience, and they do it well.

This week I’m writing about Beaujolais and its AOC wines.  Beaujolais is produced from 100% Gamay grapes grown in Burgundy region of France.  The Gamay Noir grape is a cousin to the Pinot Noir grape.  These are the only two red grape varietals allowed to be grown in Burgundy under the French AOC wine laws.  Although Burgundy may be better known for its Pinot Noir the Beaujolais wines make up about two thirds of the wine produced in Burgundy.  The wine style is light, fruity, very mellow tannin, and perfect acidity which is what makes it perfect as a food wine.  Beaujolais is produced in a style that it is meant to be consumed right away, unless we talk about the Cru versions of Beaujolais.  Beaujolais is a perfect summer wine because it should be served lightly chilled which makes it a  great to drink and serve in the spring and summer time.  There are three quality levels to understand when we learn about these wines; Beaujolais, Beaujolais – Villages which is a blend of wine from a 35 of the better wine producing villages in Beaujolais, and then there is the Cru Beaujolais.   The Cru Beaujolais wines are named for the villages that produce the finest wine of all the villages in Beaujolais.   There are ten Crus or villages, in Beaujolais and make no mistake these wines are very special. 

The price of these wines vary with the quality designations that we now understand, remember these are all extremely affordable wines with exceptional value.  The wines I’m sharing with you today are all $20.00.   In fact the Beaujolais-Villages is priced under $10.00, one of the two Beaujolais Cru wines are under $15.00, with the last one coming under $20.00.  You just can’t beat these wines.

Speaking of wine let’s get to the wines I’m sharing with you today, and please let me know what you think of todays wines after you have tasted them.   I’ll be pairing each one of these wines with the burger recipes Chef Bob was so kind to share with you and I.

The producer of these incredible wines, Georges Duboeuf,  has stated that the 2009 vintage from Beaujolais was the vintage of a lifetime and after tasting these wines with my Cru (crew), Ken, Cathy, and Andy I’m inclined to agree with the wine producer. 

Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009

Today I taste the Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009.  The Beaujolais-Villages takes its name from a number of wine-producing villages located in the area of Beaujolais which have long been identified for the superior quality of their wine.  In this instance “superior” refers to greater complexity in bouquet, higher concentration and deeper flavor.  Its distinctive character sets a kind of middle ground for Beaujolais with its unique, casual charm and the prestigious top ten Cru Beaujolais wines to the north.

Visually the Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009 appears rich, self assured and well made.  The wine is a deep ruby color with nice streaks of purple running through its veins.  It appears to be nicely viscous and upon a few good swirls in the glass it proves to be nicely structured.  Just as Rod Stewart suggested, Hot Legs, well in this case great legs in my glass that is.  You can really tell a great deal about the structure of a wine by paying attention to some of these details.  I know this wine is very well made wine by observing it.

I want to get my nose in this glass, and I recommend using a Pinot Noir glass for this wine so that this wine has every opportunity to express its Sunday best for you and I.  As every great French wine does this wine expresses a real sense of place or as we say in the wine kingdom terrior.  On the nose this wine delivers, raspberry jam, cherry, really nice earth and dust with just a hint of very nice mild smoke the follow up the rear.  These are all really beautiful fruit filled aromas.  As for the bouquet that this wine has developed in the bottle, I’m talking about the dust, earth, and smoke these are ever so mild and refined, they a true compliment to this wine as well as a real treat for me.  This wine expresses great terrior, it knows where it came from and knows where it belongs, in a glass in your hand of course. 

The Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009 is just so well made.  This wine has wonderful tannin, is lush and full of its beautiful berry self.  It is a wonderfully balanced wine that will be so food friendly due to its fruit and acid companionship.  It doesn’t stop there though this wine for me delivers a great little nuance of toast and butter too.  It’s like a great mildly toasted piece of bread with homemade raspberry and cherry jam; yes it’s a really great wine to complement the burger recipe that Chef Bob has provided.

RECIPE #1- ANGUS BURGER (For 2 people)

From Chef Bob Waggoner, host of PBS’ Ucook with Chef Bob

 INGREDIENTS:

· 2 regular sesame buns

· Angus ground beef – 160z

· Red heirloom tomato – 4 slices

· Vidalia onion – 4 slices

·Smoked bacon – 4 slices – diced finely

· Fresh rosemary -1 tablespoon

· Peeled shallots – 3 diced thinly

· Butter lettuce – half of a small head

· Salt

· Fresh ground white pepper to taste

· Aged white cheddar cheese – 2 oz diced

into small cubes

 DIRECTIONS:

In a small sauté pan cook the bacon until crisp.  Add the shallots and cook for 3 more minutes on low temperature.  Add the chopped rosemary and cook for another 30 seconds.  Remove from pan and let sit at room temperature.

Form 4 thin patties of beef approximately 4 oz each.  Then place bacon, shallot and rosemary mix on top of 2 of the patties.  Add diced cheddar, salt and fresh ground pepper.  Cover with other patty.  Pinch the sides together to form one big burger.  Salt and pepper the top of the patty.  Preheat grill and grill burgers.  When the burgers are almost done, lightly grill the bun.  On the bottom bun place the burger, Vidalia onion rings, tomato rounds and lettuce.  If you like you may add mustard, mayo or ketchup.  Top with other bun.

The 2009  Brouilly, is produced in an area that is located in the southernmost of the ten Cru Beaujolais.  On the nose you know that this is the biggest, jammiest wine in this flight of Georges Duboeuf masterpieces.  This wine delivers a message like that from Paul Revere.  It is truly intriguing as it delivers both terrior and character, which is which, now we understand it, we think.  But Ken, Cathy, and I know we like it.  This wine is large and in charge, those of us who enjoy a big fleshy, fruit driven Cabernet or a Port wine will really love this wine.  The 2009 Brouilly has nice dark fruit, plum, and black cherry.  The palate displays silk like tannin, it’s chewy with a little tobacco, yet the texture of this confident wine is like that of  the very finest velvet.  This is a beautiful wine that those of us who enjoy a slightly fuller body to our wines will absolutely love, enjoy, and crave more.

Brouilly is the largest Cru in terms of volume, as well as the most extensive in surface area.  Its vines form a large wreath around the base of the impressive Mount Brouilly, stretching out over the six villages of Odenas, Ouincle, Cercle, Saint-Lager, Charentay and Saint-Etienne-Ia-Varenne.  Its name is thought to hail back to Brulius, a lieutenant in the Imperial Roman Legion.  It is tempting to picture this officer, placed under the command of Caesar, as having the same solid, jovial persona as the most flavorful of the Cru Beaujolais.  The wines of Brouilly, known and esteemed around the globe, are true ambassadors of quality French red wines, regardless of the vineyard area.

RECIPE #2 – GRILLED PORTABELLA (BURGER) (For 2 people)

From Chef Bob Waggoner, host of PBS’ Ucook with Chef Bob

 INGREDIENTS:

· 2 large portabella mushrooms – Stems removed and gills scraped

· Fresh thyme – 2 tsp

· Green onions – 4 each

· Yellow tomato – 4 slices

· Large eggplant – 4 round slices

· 2 Kaiser Rolls

· “Beaujolais Wine” – 4 tbsp

· Olive oil – 4 tbsp

· Salt

· Fresh ground white pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

Gently drizzle the olive oil over the sliced tomatoes, eggplant and green onions. Salt and pepper all.  Gently grill and set aside -1 1/ 2 minutes on each side. Salt and pepper portabella mushroom.  With a small paring knife make checkerboard cuts going halfway into the mushroom.  Drizzle 2 tbsp each of “GDwine” onto each mushroom and let it seep in for 2 min.  Add a tiny bit of olive oil on the mushrooms and grill for 2 1/ 2 minutes on each side.  Once pulled from grill sprinkle with fresh thyme.  Gently grill Kaiser Roll.  Stack portabella mushroom, tomato, green onions and eggplant on the Kaiser Roll.

The third wine I want to share with you today is the 2009 Julienas Chateau des Capitans from one of the ten Cru villages, Cru Julienas.

The 2009 Julienas Chateau des Capitans displays intense beautiful, deep crimson color.  I recommend decanting this wine at least one hour prior to drinking so that this wine expresses itself properly, this is a great wine and was my favorite from this flight of wines.  This wine has a great balance and structure to it and will age very well in the years to come, I would even recommend laying it down for 2-4 years but if you’re like me you want to drink it.  Just be sure to decant it otherwise you may not enjoy this particular wine.  On the nose of this wine you can expect some floral, like that from peonies, dark fruit, spiciness of white pepper, smoke, dust, with a beautiful mild sweetness in the air from vanilla with a tiny bit of mocha. 

This wine displays a sumptuous deep red color. Its intense, complex nose offers an array of fruits, from peach to raspberry and black currant, with a subtle touch of cinnamon.  Ample structure and excellent balance will allow this wine to age in bottle quite gracefully.  A 19th century castle is situated right in the heart of AOC Cru Julienas, in a locality known as Les Capitans.  Centuries-old cedar trees in the stately gardens stand as tall sentinels of a long, illustrious past.  The remarkably old vines form one single, undivided vineyard circling the estate and benefit from optimal soil and microclimate conditions.  South-southeast hillside exposure to the sun allows the grapes to attain perfect ripening before they are harvested.  According to popular tradition, this locality has preserved unmistakable signs of its Roman origin.  Considered as a strategic point, this site was in all likelihood where military staff headquarters were located.  Thus the name Capitan, which refers to the officer rank of Captain, or first in command.  In the 1940’s, the castle and vineyard estate belonged to Victor Peyret, a colorful wine merchant and rambunctious gourmet from nearby Lyon who left to posterity, among other things, the literary prize he endowed.  At the annual mid-November wine festival held in the village of Julienas, the Victor Peyret prize is awarded to a celebrity from the arts who is recognized as a worthy ambassador of Cru Julienas. The prize consists of 104 bottles of choice Julienas, just the right number to enjoy every Saturday and Sunday for an entire year!  Well that depends on how many friends you share with.  Now for the burger recipe from Chef Bob.

RECIPE #3-TURKEY BURGER SLIDERS with SUNDRIED TOMATO&BASIL (For 2people)

From Chef Bob Waggoner, host of PBS’ Ucook with Chef Bob

INGREDIENTS:

· Ground turkey meat with 15% fat -1/2 pound

· Sundried tomato – 2 oz

· Shallots 3 each – sliced thinly

·Medium sized garlic cloves -3 each – sliced thinly

· Fresh basil- 8 large leaves – roughly chopped

· Olive oil – 2 tbsp

· Water – 11/ 2 cups

· Baby arugula – 1/2 cup

· Red onion – 4 slices

·1 ripe avocado

· Mini pita pockets – 4 – split in half

· Salt

· Fresh ground white pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

In a 10 inch saute pan, heat the 2 tbsp of olive oil over medium heat.  Add the sliced shallots and cook for 1minute.  Add the sliced garlic and cook for another minute.   Add the sundried tomato.  Add 1tsp of salt, 3 cranks of fresh ground white pepper and 11/ 2 cups of water and let simmer until all water is evaporated.  Add chopped basil, remove from pan and set aside.  Leave at room temperature.  Form 4 small patties using 1/2 pound of turkey meat.  Salt and pepper both sides.  Gently grill for 11/ 2 – 2 minutes per side, depending on temperature of your grill.  Grill the red onion slices at the same time. Just before the burgers are done, lightly grill the pita pocket that you have split in half. When the burger is cooked, place a small amount of arugula in the bottom of the pita.  Top with a turkey patty and arrange your slider with the grilled red onions and the sundried tomato basil mixture.

Foods that are light fair and not overly seasoned pair well with Beaujolais wines.  Today’s wines receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™ as they deliver on quality, value, and price.  Buy these wines, chill them, and drink them now, you will be satisfied, and please share your tasting notes with me.  I’m interested to know what you think, Salute.

'from my table to yours"

'from my table to yours"

Two great Mother’s Day Wines and Chef Bob Waggoner on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MST.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://wineguymike.podbean.com/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors                                                                                                                       

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world.  

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© I would be remiss if I didn’t begin by wishing my Mom and all the Mother’s who listen to my show and read my blog a Happy Mother’s Day.  I have two very special wines that I will share with you.  In fact one of these wines was so good that I had a very difficult time saving enough to have a glass to feature on a new wine tasting video.  I also had the pleasure this week of having a very special guest Chef Bob Waggoner who has a brand new series on PBS.

I’m going to start right in with these terrific wines and then feature my guest Chef Bob.  From there I will finish with a fabulous recipe from our guest and on that I love that I will pair with today’s wines from my very good friends at W.J. Deutsch & Sons.

Château Bonnet Rosé 2010

2010 Chateau Bonnet Rose

2010 Chateau Bonnet Rose

 

I would have never been expected to be blown away by a Rosé but I was.  In fact while tasting this gem from Château Bonnet in the Bordeaux region of France I found myself just wanting more.  Understand that I’m usually very restrained and disciplined with my wine tasting but I must admit I was not with this irresistible wine.

I want to give you a little background on my first selection the Château Bonnet Rosé.  The vineyards of Château Bonnet were planted during the 16th century, by the Reynier family, wealthy merchants from Libourne.  In a mere 30 years, the landscape around the house was transformed, as vines replaced forest on the surrounding slopes.

Château Bonnet lies to the North of the Entre-Deux-Mers, on the clay-chalk slopes of the commune of Grézillac, overlooking the Dordogne valley some 10km south of Saint Emilion. The estate dates back to the 17th century; when André Lurton took over in 1956, it comprised 30 hectares of vineyard, which he immediately undertook to renovate and develop. One half of the estate is devoted to white wine production and the other half is committed to the reds of Bordeaux.  From this comes a wine that is now one of my favorite wines that I have had the pleasure to taste recently.

 The 2010 Château Bonnet Rosé is a blend of 50% Cabernet Sauvignon and 50% Merlot.  This wine has a perfect alcohol level of 12.5%.  Upon first glance this Rosé looks like a beautiful jewel in the glass, a shimmering gorgeous pink glass.  It reminded me of the first girl I was ever attracted to; it was love at first site.  This wine is elegant and beautiful to look at in the glass, more of a very light strawberry color.  I hesitate to use the word pink because that color describes many blush or less than Rosé wines.  This is not that wine.

Château Bonnet Rosé 2010

Château Bonnet Rosé 2010

 

On the nose the wine presents welcome aromas of white chocolate, ever so mild caramel, strawberry, and mellow cherry.  Yes this wine’s aroma is as alluring as it is visually in a glass, are you with me I’m in love with this wine so far.

Once this beauty hit my palate it danced in my mouth, I don’t want to say it came to life because this wine brought life to my palate.  This wine is simply elegant, sophisticated, and refined.  But here is what I need a wine to be, not over done and not under done.  I love a wine that is allowed to be itself, left alone, and not manipulated.  Let me tell you this is that wine, it is perfect in every sense of the word and in your mouth.  This Rosé is perfectly balanced with fruit, acid, and the perfect percentage of alcohol.  It is beautifully understated with nuances of strawberry and cherry and also expressing very mild pomegranate.  You will experience a perfect crispness and a mellow tartness in this wine that has a lovely and refreshing mouthfeel.

This wine is like a great movie or song you cannot get out of your head, it has such a desirable long lasting finish that leaves you absolutely longing for more.  Just buy two bottles because you just have to have more of this incredible wine.  This wine receives the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™

Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009

Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009

Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009

 

This wine style is made from 100% Gamay grapes from The Burgundy Region of France.  The wine is light and fruity and meant to be consumed right away.  Beaujolais can also be served lightly chilled which is great for the spring and summer time.  There are three quality levels Beaujolais, Beaujolais – Villages which is a blend of wine from a multiple villages in Beaujolais, and then there is the Cru which is named for the village whom produces the finest wine of all the villages, of which there are ten Crus or villages, in Beaujolais.

Today I taste the Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009.  The Beaujolais-Villages takes its name from a number of wine-producing villages located in the area of Beaujolais which have long been identified for the superior quality of their wine.  In this instance “superior” refers to greater complexity in bouquet, higher concentration and deeper flavor.  Its distinctive character sets a kind of middle ground for Beaujolais with its unique, casual charm and the prestigious top ten Cru Beaujolais wines to the north.

Visually the Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009 appears rich, self assured and well made.  The wine is a deep ruby color with nice streaks of purple running through its veins.  It appears to be nicely viscous and upon a few good swirls in the glass it proves to be nicely structured.  Just as Rod Stewart suggested, Hot Legs, well in this case great legs in my glass that is.  You can really tell a great deal about the structure of a wine by paying attention to some of these details.  I know this wine is very well made wine by observing it.

I want to get my nose in this glass, and I recommend using a Pinot Noir glass for this wine so that this wine has every opportunity to present its Sunday best for you.  As every great French wine does this wine expresses a real sense of place or as we say in the wine kingdom terrior.  The nose delivers, raspberry jam, cherry, really nice earth and dust with just a hint of very nice mild smoke the follow up the rear.  These are all really beautiful fruit filled aromas.  As for the bouquet that this wine has developed in the bottle, I’m talking about the dust, earth, and smoke these are ever so mild and refined, they a true compliment to this wine as well as a real treat for me.  This wine expresses great terrior, it knows where it came from and knows where it belongs, in a glass in your hand of course. 

Vintage of a Life-Time

Vintage of a Life-Time

 

The Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009 is just so well made.  This wine has wonderful tannin, is lush and full of its beautiful berry self.  It is a wonderfully balanced wine that will be so food friendly due to its fruit and acid companionship.  It doesn’t stop there though this wine for me delivers a great little nuance of toast and butter too.  It’s like a great mildly toasted piece of bread with homemade raspberry and cherry jam; yes it’s a really great wine to complement your Mother’s Day brunch or dinner.

This exquisite wine aims to please everyone, and it will.  It fills your nose and your mouth with beautiful lush fruit that is perfectly done.  Georges Duboeuf is one of the producer/suppliers whose wine I recommend purchasing, it’s always consistent and very good. I recommend this wine it is perhaps that ideal, multipurpose red wine we all look for.   The Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009 pairs well with cheese, veal, fish, or fowl.  Foods that are light fair and not overly seasoned pair well with Beaujolais wines.  This wine also receives the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™, wow two for two today.

Todays special guest Chef Bob Waggoner

Ever since Julia Child and Jacques Pepin entered our kitchens through PBS to demystify French cuisine, audiences have been intrigued with elegant entertaining at home.  Today Chef Bob Waggoner graciously invites us into his kitchen, in charming Charleston South Carolina, where each day he guides one lucky guest from the live studio audience through the joys of gourmet cooking and wine selection.

Chef Bob

Bob Waggoner grew up in Southern California and received his first culinary training through a home economics course he took in high school.  This quickly blossomed into a lifelong career. He began in the kitchen of Michael Roberts at Trumps in West Hollywood, then went to work for a succession of great chefs in the Burgundy region of France.  His first position as Chef was at Members, a private club in Caracas, Venezuela at age 23.  He returned to France where he met his wife and became the first American to own his own restaurant in France, the much acclaimed Monte Cristo when he was only 26 years old.

A Southern boy at heart, Bob returned to the States with his wife and young daughter after 11 years abroad.  He landed on Turnberry Isle in Florida; he then joined The Wild Boar in Nashville, earning the restaurant the coveted AAA Five-Diamond Award as well as the Grand Award from Wine Spectator magazine.  The rich, multi-cultural cuisine of the Low country drew him to South Carolina, where he was at the helm of the elegant Charleston Grill at Charleston Place for 12 years.  This earned Chef Bob a nomination from the James Beard Foundation for Best Chef in the Southeast.

Thanks to his rigorous culinary training in France, he is one of the few Americans to be knighted as a Chevalier with the Ordre du Merite Agricole(National Order of Agriculture Merit).  He is the only American to have worked with Gerard Boyer, Pierre Gagnaire and Marc Meneau, three of the French honorees with whom he was acknowledged at Gourmet Magazine’s event, France’s 10 Greatest Chefs.  Chef Bob has numerous T.V. appearances but it his television show “Off the Menu” that earned an Emmy.  He now shares his knowledge of essential technique, respect for the finest ingredients through a farm to table approach on his new PBS program Ucook with Chef Bob.  You can find out what Chef Bob is up to online at; http://ucookwithchefbob.com/

Recipes to accompany your wines.  WineGuyMike™ recommends pairing this with Château Bonnet Rosé 2010

From Chef Bob and Ucook on PBS

Grilled Diver Scallops with a Pineapple, Cilantro & Pink Peppercorn Salsa

Grilled Diver Scallops with a Pineapple, Cilantro & Pink Peppercorn Salsa

Grilled Diver Scallops with a Pineapple, Cilantro & Pink Peppercorn Salsa

 

Ingredients

1/2 ripe, fresh pineapple, diced fine

1 tablespoon pink peppercorns

1 tablespoon coriander seeds

3 limes, juiced

2 teaspoons kosher salt

5 cranks fresh-ground white pepper

2 shallots, chopped fine

6 tablespoons virgin olive oil

1/2 bunch fresh cilantro (leaves only), chopped at the last minute

2 tablespoons kosher salt

8 cranks fresh-ground white pepper

16 large diver scallops

You may want to make the salsa the day before serving and just add the oil and fresh cilantro at the last minute.

Finely dice the pineapple and mix together with the pink peppercorns, coriander seeds, lime juice, salt and pepper. Add the raw shallots, olive oil, and fresh chopped cilantro. Keep the salsa as cold as possible. The fun of this dish is the hot-cold, sweet-acid sensation. For the scallops, sprinkle the salt and pepper over all sides of the scallops and cover all sides with a small amount of olive oil. On a very hot grill, cook the scallops 30 seconds on each side, keeping the grill top open. Overcooked scallops are terrible, so you’ll want to keep them a nice medium-rare. Remove the scallops from the grill and arrange 4 scallops on each plate. Cover each scallop with 1/2 tablespoon of the pineapple salsa and serve.

TIP: Lesser-quality scallops are soaking in juice-if these are the only ones available, let them dry on a towel several minutes ahead of time. Better yet, save this recipe until you find great diver scallops!

TIP: To retain the color of the herb when chopping herbs like cilantro, use the sharpest knife in the kitchen rather than pinching it with a dull knife.

If you’re lucky enough to live in an area where you can purchase scallops in the shell, use the half-shell as your plate. Best of all, you will know the scallops are fresh.

This is a recipe from WineGuyMike™.  I recommend pairing this with the Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages 2009

Pork Medallions in Cream Sauce

Serves 4; 3 ounces pork and 1/4 cup sauce per serving

Ingredients:

1 pound pork tenderloin, all visible fat removed, cut into 1-inch-thick slices

Vegetable oil spray

2 teaspoons acceptable margarine

1 small onion, chopped

1 cooking apple, such as Granny Smith, peeled, cored, and chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

5-ounce can evaporated skim milk

1/8 teaspoon salt

Pinch of white pepper

Pinch of ground nutmeg

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Directions:

Flatten each pork slice on a hard surface with the palm of your hand. Using the flat side of a meat mallet, pound pork slices to 1/4-inch thickness.

Spray a large skillet with vegetable oil spray and place over medium-high heat. Add pork in a single layer. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until tender and no longer pink. Remove from skillet. Reduce heat to medium.

In same skillet, melt margarine. Add onion and apple. Cook over medium heat for 5 minutes, or until onion is tender, stirring constantly. Add garlic and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in remaining ingredients except parsley. Simmer, uncovered, for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in parsley.

Return pork to skillet. Spoon sauce over pork. Cook over low heat for 1 minute, or until heated through.

Calories: 225

Protein: 29 g

Carbohydrates: 11 g

Total Fat: 7 g

Saturated Fat: 2 g

Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g

Monounsaturated Fat: 3 g

Cholesterol: 73 mg

Sodium: 197 mg

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

Wines for your Easter Dinner from WineGuyMike™


I have posted charts indicating wine pairings that will best suit the meals you’re serving with your Easter Dinner.  Tonight I will begin posting some of my favorite bottle selections that I will be adding to this evening(Friday).  Saturday morning there will be numerous individual wine selections by the bottle.  Be sure to check back, and I wish you all a Good Friday.

Morning Show  TV segment; www.nbcmontana.com/news/27624512/detail.html

Here is a little YouTube preview for you; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61gJ9z8s3aw

One thing to consider when you are selecting a wine to go with your Easter dinner and you’re trying to decide if you and your guests would like a light, medium, or a full-bodied wine to drink.  Think of wine as you would be drinking it as milk.  A light body wine would be skim milk, medium body wine would be 2%, and whole milk would be like a full-bodied wine.  This is a good guide to remember as most people can relate to the weight and mouthfeel of those styles of milk and translate that into a style of wine they may prefer.

Light Body Wine Ham Vegetarian Sirloin or Filet Game
Reisling x x    
Gewurztraminer x x    
Chenin Blanc x x    
Viognier x x    
Pinot Grigio x x    
Beaujolais x x x x
Pinot Noir x x x x
Burgundy   x x x
Valpolicella     x x
Bardolino     x x
Chianti     x x

Light Body Wine

Riesling – one of the prominent white wine grapes, a pure Riesling is complex yet delicate.  Some Rieslings are just pretenders made from inferior grapes,  a Riesling will be light, medium dry, fruity, a mild citrus flavor, with a mellow floral aroma.

Pinot Blanc -complex and spicy with fruit and citrus flavors, enjoy this bright fruity wine.

Gewurztraminer – wine is spicy, fruity, floral, and herbal.  This is a dry, earthy, aromatic wine that is genuinely refreshing.

Chenin Blanc – this is a very versatile grape.  It is very crisp, acidic, high in alcohol content, yet is smooth and full-bodied.   This grape exhibits  slight spiciness,  a hint of honey, and slight fruitiness.  This can be a very special wine, such as Vouvray, an excellent wine exhibiting many different styles.

Viognier – this grape from the Rhone valley in France is also making a name for itself in California. Viognier is a very dry, delicate wine with floral aromas and apricot overtones.

Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris – commonly referred to is a very dry wine.  Some characteristics of this wine are a slightly fruity, and mild spiciness.

Beaujolais – is produced from the Gamay and is made to be drunk very young, right after bottling.  This is a light bodied red that has very little tannin and is low in alcohol content.  It is a fruity red wine that has berry overtones.

Pinot Noir/ Burgundy – is the grape variety of red Burgundian wines, it can produce wines that are incredible.  When aged in oak it will have a very mild sweetness reminiscent of raspberries, with undertones of vegetation and chocolate.   The wine can stand up to aging for many years.  Pinot Noir at its best will be smooth, full of flavor, and a beautiful bouquet.

Valpolicella – light, fragrant table wines in flavor.  These wines can be produced in a nouveau style, similar to Beaujolais nouveau and released only a few weeks after harvest

Bardolino – is an Italian red wine that is a light and fragrant table wine.  The blend of grapes used to produce the wine includes Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara. A blend of up to 15% may include Rossignola, Barbera, Sangiovese and/or Garganega.

Chianti – This wine is made predominantly from Sangiovese which exhibits nuances of spice, cherry and raspberry flavors but can be blended with other red varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, and Merlot.  These wines are styled differently so you need to experiment with which producers wine you prefer.

 

Medium Body Wine Ham Ribeye Prime Rib Sirloin or Filet Game
Fume Blanc          
Sauvignon Blanc          
Sancerre          
Pouilly-Fume          
Macon- Villages          
St.-Veran          
Chablis Premier Cru          
Sangiovese x x   x x
Shiraz x x   x x
Merlot x x x x x
Chianti Classico   x x x x
Bordeaux   x x x x

Medium Body Wine

Sangiovese – one word Chianti, This grape is also the major contributor for many other fantastic Italian reds. This spicy medium bodied red also exhibits cherry and raspberry flavors. 

Shiraz-Syrah big, powerful medium to full-bodied wine, Shiraz in Australia.   This grape produces wines that are supple, smooth, and rich with well-mannered mellow tannins.  Flavor wise the wine will present slight spiciness, fruity like black cherries, or some may have a deep nutty flavoring.

Merlot- It tends to be soft, smooth, and very fruit forward. Winemakers the world over are creating rich style merlots that are wines full of cherry and oak flavors.

Chianti Classico – This wine is made predominantly from Sangiovese which exhibits nuances of spice, cherry and raspberry flavors but can be blended with other red varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, and Merlot.  These wines are styled differently so you need to experiment with which producers wine you prefer.  This is a step up in quality from Chianti, the grapes come from the inner historic district of Chianti.

Bordeaux – wines are red blended wines; Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot.  Please see this link to understand how to make your purchasing decision; http://wineguymike.com/Bordeaux_Red.aspx

Full Body Wine Ham Lamb Ribeye Prime Rib Sirloin or Filet Game
Chardonnay x x x x x x
Chablis Grand Cru x x x x x x
Meursault x x x x x x
Chateautneuf-Du-Pape   x x x x  
Barbaresco   x x x x  
Barolo   x x x x  
Zinfandel   x x x x  
Bordeaux- Best Chateaus   x x x x  
Cabernet Sauvignon   x x x x  

Full Body Wine

Chardonnay – complex white wines, thanks to winemaking techniques, and the grapes ability to draw flavor from the nutrients and minerals in the soil.  Chardonnay is aged in new oak barrels, old oak barrels, and steel barrels, all producing varying nuances in the wines.  New barrels produce the strongest oaking, old barrels have a slight oak influence, while the steel has no oakiness.  This dry wine is rich, bold, full of fruitiness, vanilla and a certain toastiness, just to name a few characteristics.

Chablis Grand Cru -dry wine made from 100 % Chardonnay, these are expensive limited production wines.  This is the best white Burgundy and has the highest classification.  A link for more info; http://wineguymike.com/Chablis.aspx

Meursault – these dry chardonnay wines from Cote De Beaune in the Burgundy region are some of the finest in the world, a style and quality of wine admired worldwide.

Chateautneuf-Du-Pape – mainly a Grenache and Syrah blend, but may contain as many as 13 grape types.  These are big full-bodied reds that get a lot of sun.  Sugar content is higher from the sun which means the alcohol content is higher.  Link for more info; http://wineguymike.com/Rhone.aspx

Barbaresco & Barolo – from northern Italy. California is also working with the Nebbiolo. Best known for huge, robust, full  bodied wines such as the Barbarescos’ and Barolos’. A big wine like this may need a decade to mature properly. These wines tend to be heavy on tannin and high in alcohol content.  Aged correctly this wine will be chewy, with hints of berries, herbs, and slightly floral.

Zinfandel full-bodied, fruit forward, and spicy wine.  Berries, cherries, tobacco, oak, and vanilla this wine seems to have it all.

Bordeaux- wines are red blended wines; Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot.  Please see this link to understand how to make your purchasing decision; http://wineguymike.com/Bordeaux_Red.aspx

Cabernet Sauvignon – big, powerful red wine that is full in body, rich, and  imparts flavors of fruits, berries, currants, plums,  spicy nuances.

 
"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"