“Wine Just for the Health of It” part 2 this week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/10/30/wine-guy-mike-for-october-30th/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors

      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at www.CiaoMambo.com

Sleep City Missoula www.sleepcity.com

 W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Welcome to the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this Sunday morning.  This week I had the pleasure of sitting down with a man who enjoys great wines from around the world.  Dr.Stan Wilson from Missoula, Montana is a world renowned Cardiologist and inventor.

You might ask why such an accomplished doctor lives in a small city like Missoula?  Missoula is host to the International Heart Institute at St. Patrick Hospital which is the number one program for heart surgical procedures and research in the world.  The other reason Missoula may be one of the coolest places to live is The University of Montana.  Culture, art, wine, excellent medical care, and great restaurants just make this university centered city a great place to live and work.  In Dr. Wilson’s case, practice his cardiology specialty.

About The International Heart Institute of Montana http://ihimontana.org/

The International Heart Institute of Montana (IHI) brings together a recognized team of cardiologists, heart surgeons, nurses and researchers to perform advanced cardiac procedures and to search for new and improved ways to treat heart disease. Founded in 1995, IHI involves physicians and staff of St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center and The University of Montana.

What is The Women’s Heart Health Program offered at the IHI?

Many of us are surprised to learn that one in three women will die from cardiovascular disease.  Heart disease and stroke kill more women than all cancers combined, including breast cancer.  It remains an underappreciated fact that more women than men die of cardiovascular disease every year.

The Women’s Heart Health Program is a comprehensive way to prevent, diagnose and treat heart disease in women.  Heart disease may be especially difficult to diagnose in women as they may have different symptoms than men.  This program helps women to identify and reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy.  The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent heart disease by increasing levels of “good” cholesterol and protecting against artery damage.

“Wine Just for the Health of It” is part 2 of an ongoing series on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©.  This mission of my show is to share great wine and food in a moderate healthful way.  Sometimes we forget about the wonderful and natural health benefits that both red and white wine provide as part of a daily lifestyle that we enjoy.

The American Heart Association recommends a daily glass of wine to keep the heart doctors away.  Woman should drink one 5oz. glass and for men 10oz. is the recommended amount.  They medical community is quick to say if you don’t drink alcohol now do not start.  The recommendation here is over consumption may could lead to alcoholism, while increased caloric intake could contribute to obesity which increases the risk of diabetic complications.

As Doctor Wilson points out there is plenty of science to back up the health benefits of the daily recommended amount of wine.  In fact studies show that drinking the recommended amount of wine may reduce the risk of heart disease by as much as 50%.  Medical associations now recommend white wine for those that have respiratory issues. 

The right diet to complement the recommended moderate consumption of wine is a way that we can still enjoy all that we love about wine and food.  It is very important to examine our lifestyle and think about how we can live in a healthier way.  Remember the old saying, “you are what you eat”, it still holds true.  WineGuyMike™ would like to recommend this website for great information on healty eating, recipes, and exercise recommendations.  www.Heart.org is a site that I found to be outstanding.

Dr. Wilson, the inventor, developed what is known as Bifurcated Stent.  The stent is a stainless steel tube that looks like a microscopic piece of chain-link fence.  An incision in the patient’s groin is the point of entry for the physician to snake the stent up to the damaged artery.  A balloon opens up a path way to insert on the end of the wire.  A patient’s own tissue will grow around the stent in four to six weeks.  Stents act as reinforcement for arteries.

20 percent of the time a blockage is at a junction, or bifurcation.  Stents on each branch would leave a junction unprotected and a stent placed at a junction could block one of the arteries.

The bifurcated stent goes in on the end of one wire while the cardiologist snakes it to the site, imagine a Y-shaped device with its legs tied together.  Once the bifurcated stent reaches the site the wire releases and then the stent opens up and is guided into the bifurcation.

The bifurcated stent is in use in Europe and is nearing FDA approval in the United States.  This magical device should begin to be used in cardiology procedures in the United States next year.   Dr. Wilson gets to be the magician.

As a result of Dr. Wilsons Bifurcated Stent invention he is invited as key note speaker for heart conferences around the world.  Many of these conferences take place in finest wine regions of the world.  This week I’m sharing Dr. Wilson’s favorite wine, the E Guigal Gigondas.  I invite you to listen to the entire conversation between Dr. Wilson and I.  the podcast is available at; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/10/30/wine-guy-mike-for-october-30th/

E. Guigal wine from the Rhone Valley of France

the domaine of E. Guigal is located at Ampuis, and was founded in 1946 by Etienne Guigal, who had apprenticed at the negociant Vidal Fleury starting in 1924.  Etienne’s son Marcel has been the winemaker of the family firm since 1962.  He has preserved the tradition of the Rhône region and the scrupulous methods of his father, without hesitating to modernize and update his methods in ways that improve the traditional style without violating the spirit of the appellation.  Philippe Guigal, Marcel’s son, is poised to carry on these traditions of innovation and quality well into the 21st century.

E. Guigal is both a domaine and negociant, vinifying grapes from its estate vineyards in Côte Rôtie, Condrieu, Crozes Hermitage, Hermitage, and St. Joseph.  Guigal buys grapes from other growers in Côte Rôtie and Condrieu to supplement his estate production, and buys wines from other AOCs, including all of his southern Rhône production.  All wines are aged, finished and bottled in the firm’s own cellars, which have undergone several renovations and expansions since 1995.  A new cellar completed in 2006 has allowed the Guigals to store all of their production under their own roof for the first time.

The Rhone Valley is one of France’s most important wine growing regions covering a long strip of land from Avignon in the south to Vienne in the north.  This area produces more appellation wine than any other part of France, except that of the Bordeaux region.  This very diverse region is split into two sections.  The two main red grapes grown in the Rhone are Syrah and Grenache.  The north which is a semi-continental environment is dominated by the Syrah grape and prestigious appellations which include Côte-Rôtie, Hermitage and St Joseph.  The south has a Mediterranean climate and produces mainly blended wines from varieties such as Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre and Carignan.  

Syrah is a grape that is a big powerful full bodied red that is supple, smooth, and rich with well mannered mellow tannins.  Flavor wise a Syrah can be slightly spicy, fruity like black cherries, or some may have a deep nutty flavoring.  Grenache is a grape that is famous for use as a blending grape in both France and Spain. Grenache is also full bodied with berry flavors.  It lends itself well to nice full reds or roses that produce fruity or berry like flavor.  The Mourvedreplays a strong supporting role as a blending grape that is fruity with berry flavor and tannin that help provide structure in the red wines I’m recommending today.

E Guigal Gigondas

The vineyards of Gigondas are planted on hillsides at the foot of Mont Ventoux, a region directly north-east of the town of Orange in the southern Rhône Valley.  The Rhone Valley is home to very rocky soils that collect heat from the abundant sunshine that is common in the Rhone.  The grape varieties are similar to Chateauneuf-du-Pape; Grenache (60%), Mourvèdre (30%), and Syrah (10%) predominate. The dry, stony slopes produce substantial wines that are deep in color, with flavors of ripe summer fruits and savory herbs.  This E Guigal Gigondas is polished, refined, and drinks well now or can be laid down for many years.

E Guigal Cotes du Rhone Rouge

This is a beautiful wine that is inexpensive. This blend from the well known Guigal family is 50% Syrah, 40% Grenache, and 10% Mourvèdre.  The grapes are grown in pebbles and alluvia soil matter, sediment, limestone, granite.  This provides great drainage for the grape vines.

The grapes for this wine spend a great deal of time with the skins are fermented in a cool temperature controlled environment.  Aged 1 ½ years in oak but this wine presents with only a minimal oak influence. Visually this wine is dark red with great depth, and a beautiful shimmer. On the nose this wine has an aroma of red berries, fresh fruit, and just a hint of spice.  The palate is ample, not to full, really a great example of an affordable Cotes du Rhone.  This wine is balanced and very well made.  Nice tannin and spice that is enticing with a long rich finish.  This wine is very aromatic in a very pleasing way.

The Guigal Cotes du Rhone Red will pair nicely with cold cuts, cheese, wild game birds, pheasant and quail in particular.

E Guigal Cotes du Rhone Blanc

Marcel Guigal has strayed from his Father’s blanc blend of Clairette, Grenache Blanc, and Bourboulenc. This delicious blanc blend now includes significant proportions of Viognier (now 50%), Marsanne (from St.-Péray), and Roussanne.  Fermentation at cool temperatures in stainless steel tanks produces a wine that is fresh, rich, and complex.  The beautiful nose of this wine has aromas of honeysuckle, pear, kiwi, and minerals.  This dry white from E Guigal pairs well with appetizers, grilled fish, or spicy Asian preparations.

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

Advertisements

Cin Cin its Chianti this week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/10/23/wine-guy-mike-for-october-23/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors   

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at http://www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Welcome to the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this Sunday morning.

Now that fall is upon us I have been focusing on wines that are seasonally transitional and offer great value.  This week I want to share Italian wine with you, specifically Chianti. 

What is Chianti?  Is it a grape, is it a wine style, or is it a place? What is Chianti beside the fact that it is a wine that is great to drink especially with a meal.  

Italian wine is arguably the best food wine in the world and Chianti certainly fits this profile.  Italians love their wine bright with fruit, acidic, and with a slightly bitter finish.  Chianti is a perfect example of this style of wine.

The bright fruit of an Italian wine is what you first notice in your glass.  As you examine the aroma you smell the fruit or what is known as the nose of the wine.

Once you take in the aroma of your Chianti your sense of smell now makes your mouth or palate desire a taste of the luscious liquid in your glass.  Take a small sip and swish the wine about in your mouth, that’s right just like your mouthwash.  Once your swallow the wine think about all the things you are experiencing with this particular wine.  With Chianti you will notice four different sensations on your palate.  The fruit delivers the first impression, and then you will notice the mouth-feel which is the weight or body of the wine, and the texture.  Chianti is a lively or acidic wine, this will also be apparent on your palate.  This is important to a food friendly wine because this is what brings out flavor in food.  As you swallow your wine you will then notice the tannin in the wine which comes from the wine being macerated or together at the beginning of the winemaking process with the stems and skins of the grape.  This is the sensation in Chianti that you will experience and think to yourself, this wine is dry.  The last sensation you may be left with is a slightly bitter finish, this is not a bad thing.  Remember we are talking about Chianti, an Italian table wine made to be enjoyed with a meal from the Tuscany region.

Chianti is made predominantly from the Sangiovese grape.  Sangiovese produces wines that can be spicy, are medium bodied with nuances of cherry and raspberry flavors.  The Sangiovese grape is a warm weather varietal that thrives in the Tuscany region of Italy.  This grape is grown and producing lovely wines in California too.

Tuscany is the region of Italy in which Chianti is produced; remember Sangiovese is the main grape varietal used in a Chianti wine.  Within Tuscany lies the Chianti and Chianti Classico grape growing and wine producing areas.

It is very important to know that there are three different levels of Chianti wine that are governed by an Italian law or what is known as the DOC and DOCG.  You will see this printed on the label of your Italian wine.  There are many Italian wines that do not adhere to wines specifications within particular regions and these wines will be designated on their label as IGT.  The difference between the DOC and DOCG is that the G in DOCG stylistically is guaranteed to meet the standards set forth in Italian wine laws for specific regions. 

The DOC governs:

  1. Geographical limits of each region
  2. Grapes varieties allowed in wines
  3. The percentage of each grape used (Classico must be 80% Sangiovese)
  4. The amount of grapes that can be grown and harvested per acre
  5. The minimum percentage of alcohol in a wine
  6. Minimum aging requirements.  How much time a wine is aged in barrels or bottles

These wine laws became effective in 1963 in Italy.

As you look at the label on a bottle of Chianti it will be designated one of three things.

  1. Chianti – a basic table wine from a broad general area within the Tuscany wine region.  This is the least expensive Chianti.
  2. Chianti Classico – this wine is more expensive and comes from the inner historic district of Chianti.  This is a better quality wine that has been given more attention in the winemaking process.  The grapes come from better vineyards that produce wines with a sense of place.
  3. Chianti Classico Riserva – these are the finest Chianti’s made the very best grapes,  are a result of the most laborious winemaking attention, and are aged for a minimum of two years and three months.  These Classico Riserva’s also come with the highest price tags.

Chianti is great wine to drink with an Italian meal.  Because of the natural acidity in a Chianti wine you are assured that your wine pairing will bring out the all flavor in your meal.  Chianti is a medium bodied wine that will not compete with your meal.  Remember with big robust foods you do not want a wine that is equally robust or they will simply nullify one another.

My recommendation for pairing Chianti wine with your meal is this; pasta dishes with red sauces and chicken, meatballs or sausage I recommend Chianti.  This wine is a perfect partner to these dishes.  The perceived bitter finish from table Chianti when it is tasted alone is non-existent when enjoyed with your meal.  This slight bitterness helps balance the sweetness from the fruit in a tomato based sauce, it is not a bad thing this just enhances your meal. 

Chianti wines are made to keep your meal and your palate lively and awake and craving more.  Most traditional Italian dinners are multi-coursed and this is exactly why Chianti is balanced and structured the way that it is.

Italian dinners that would be considered fine dining as opposed to the family style Italian dinners my family enjoys this time of year is the time to serve a Chianti Classico.  If it is a special occasion you might consider serving a Chianti Classico Riserva.  The Classico and Classico Riserva will have a little fuller and richer mouth-feel to them on the palate.  Either of these wine selections would pair perfectly with my favorite dish that I share with you, Bracciole.  The Classico Chianti’s have more depth, tannin that is more refined, in general a much richer wine than a table Chianti.  Considering the rich style of Chianti Classico these wines will pair nicely with more elegant Italian beef based dishes.

Enjoy this wonderful wine from Tuscany with a beautiful Italian dinner, Salute.

Chianti Wine Recommendations

The history of the Mazzei family is deep in Tuscany’s winemaking tradition and history.  The first recorded mention of the Mazzei family was noted in documents traced back to the early 11th century.

Poggio alla Badiola IGT Toscana retails for under $15.00 is a blend of 70% Sangiovese, 30% Merlot.  This IGT Chianti has beautiful depth in color and intensely aromatic dark fruits and mocha.  Balance, depth, and structure deliver a supple and smooth wine on the palate.  A long finish of dark fruits and berries, delicious.

Fonterutoli Chianti Classico DOCG retails for under $25.00 is a blend of 90% Sangiovese, 2% Malvasia Nera, 3% Colorino, 5% Merlot.  Bright Ruby red with streaks of violet are what you see from this beautiful wine in your glass.  On the nose this wine has subtle aromas of smoke, red cherries, and thyme.  Delightful indeed.  On the palate this wine is refined, fruity, and lively with acid.  A great food wine.

Recipe for Bracciole

1 stick of real butter

2 tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

8 four inch pieces of Round Steak pounded thin

Salt and Pepper to taste

4 garlic gloves smashed and finely chopped

½ cup of Italian Parsley

4 hard boiled eggs medium chopped

1 cup of Italian bread crumbs

Tomato Sauce, prepare your favorite basic sauce

Melt butter and olive oil in a sauce pan then brush onto both sides of meat. 

Next apply salt and pepper to taste.

Spread Garlic onto one side of meat.

Next add the layer of bread crumbs.

Now add a layer of the Italian parsley.

Now layer the chopped hardboiled eggs.

Now you need to roll the meat up and tie with poultry thread.

Next you brown the rolls of meat on a medium heat for about 4 minutes. Turning the rolls and being careful not to overcook.

Take the rolls from your pan to the pot of tomato sauce and simmer for about 4 hours.

Make your favorite pasta, add the sauce with a couple of the rolls of Bracciole.

This is my favorite Italian dinner that I share with you.   

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

Paul Hobbs Endless Summer of Wine on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/10/16/wine-guy-mike-for-october-16/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors  

    

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at http://www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world.

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Welcome to the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this Sunday morning.  Paul Hobbs has been referred to as pioneer, trendsetter, trailblazer, and a prospector.  Originally from Upstate New York Paul grew up in a farming environment.  His first exposure to wine was a 1962 Château d’Yquem that his father brought home and poured into paper cups at the family dinner table.  This memorable wine filled the room with an unforgettable aroma and a never ending impression on Paul’s mind and palate.  His love and passion for wine began and in 1969 Paul convinced his father to replace trees in their apple orchard with grape vines.

Paul studied at Notre Dame with the intent of becoming a doctor.  His botany professor had been a former winemaker at Christian Brothers Winery in California and held weekly wine tasting seminars.  The rest was history, Paul’s focus shifted to winemaking.  His master’s program took Paul to UC Davis were he enrolled in the Master of Food Science program in the Department of Enology.

Paul’s thesis on Oak Extraction landed him a research job with Robert Mondavi Winery.  It was at the Mondavi Winery that his hands on wine production experience gained him a promotion as Enologist.  In 1981 Paul was named Head Enologist of Opus One.

In 1985 Paul moved to Simi Winery as Assistant Winemaker and it was here that his interest in other wine-regions around the world grew.  Chile and Argentina were two of the emerging new wine-regions that really intrigued him.  Paul’s recognition as a winemaker landed him consulting rolls with many other premium wineries in California.

In 1991 Paul decided to strike out on his own and founded Paul Hobbs Winery.  His mission was to produce small lot, hand-crafted, vineyard designate wines.  He started with three wines—one chardonnay, one pinot noir and one cabernet sauvignon.  He strove to produce wines that represented a sense of place and today he produces a dozen wines from new and historic vineyards.

Paul purchased 19 acres of land in 1998 located in the Russian River Valley.  He produces wine there that is recognized throughout the world as some of the very finest.  Paul Hobbs is one of the top winemakers in the world now and as a trailblazer he lives an Endless Summer of wine.  During our North American winter Paul travels to Argentina in the Mendoza wine-region to make wine at his property that he is a partner in, Viña Cobos Felino. 

Viña Cobos owners  Andrea Marchiori, Luis Barraud, and Paul Hobbs all whose winemaking backgrounds are steeped in Old World European winemaking tradition.  This team’s goal for Viña Cobos was to produce an unparalleled Malbec that exuded power and elegance.  In 1999 Viña Cobos released their first vintage of Malbec which received the highest score for any Argentinean wine.

The portfolio of wine has grown with continued accolades for the Viña Cobos partners.  This family of wine now includes three tiers which include Cobos, Bramare and Felino.  All three of these labels offer exceptional chardonnay, merlot, malbec and cabernet sauvignon.

Paul Hobbs has always been committed to crafting unfiltered and unfined wines and utilizing native yeasts in the fermenting process.  His commitment to winemaking technique results in exceptional wines that are well structured. Paul’s wines are a product of classic old world technique.

The Felino wines express great balance of pure, concentrated fruit that is lively with acidity and smooth, fine, tannins.  The Viña Cobos Felino label offers Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Chardonnay that is vibrant, lush, mouth-filling wine with beautiful texture that pairs exceptionally well with food.  Did I mention these wines sell for under $16.00.  These wines offer incredible value as many of Paul’s California wine offerings are far north of $100.00.

I recently tasted through a horizontal lineup, or wines from same vintage of 2009 Viña Cobos Felino starting with the chardonnay.  Visually this wine has beautiful straw color and the wine is not fined which allows sediment to be suspended in the glass.  This is not to say that the wine does not present elegant.  This chardonnay is produced utilizing the native yeast which forms on the grapes in the vineyard.  This allows the wine to truly deliver a real sense of the vineyard in which the grapes are grown.  On the nose this wine presents nice vegetal, herbaceous, caramel and earthy aromas.  My palate came alive with green apple, white pepper, straw, acid, citrus, and yeast.  Just delightful.  The finish is what I loved though as I found it to be one of the most unusual finishes I’ve experienced in a wine.  The finished lingered like that of a nice single malt Scotch, clean with a little heat from the white pepper.  A very nice wine indeed.

The 2009 Viña Cobos Felino Cabernet Sauvignon is 88% cabernet sauvignon, 8 % syrah, 4% petit verdot.  The grapes get a 3 to 4 day cold soak; 15 to 18 days total maceration and are fermented with selected and native yeasts.  This wine receives second native malolactic fermentation in barrel for 5 months and is then aged 9 months in American and French oak barrels, 20% of these are new oak.

This is a big, 14.5% alcohol,  yet very refined in a way that it has not been over manipulated.  A deep ruby hue paves the way for a nose that is ripe with aromas of saddle leather, subtle sweet tobacco, minerality, and earthiness. The palate is lush with a rich well rounded mouth-feel that is complex.  There is a great balance of dark fruit, black currant and boysenberry, mineral, sweet tobacco, and acid. This wine is both rich yet remains lively and well structured with perfect tannin.

2009 Felino Viña Cobos Malbec. This 100% malbec undergoes a 3 to 4 day cold soak with a 15 to 18 days total maceration.  There is secondary native malolactic fermentation in the barrel taking 4 months to complete.  Visually this 2009 Malbec presents a beautiful crimson color in the glass.  The nose of this South American beauty is ripe with red raspberry, anise, with a slight nuance of cocoa, a wonderful aroma.  The palate delivers a rich spicy mouth-feel that reveals fruit, a hint of caramel and mineral.  This malbec has a nice round balance with sturdy structure.  This wine is supple, smooth with refined tannin that makes this a great wine to drink and pair with food.  A long finish from this wine that you don’t want to end.

The wines reviewed today all receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

A New Wine Season on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/10/09/wine-guy-mike-for-october-9th/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at http://www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Welcome to the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© this Sunday morning.  Fall is in the air, colors of trees are changing and beautiful.  Soccer and football fields are filled with kids, coaches, and parents.  The air is becoming brisk, the sun is lower in the sky yet still warm enough in the afternoon that you have to shed your jacket.

It occurs to me that with each new season the types of food we eat, the way we prepare food, our style of food, how we drink wine, and the type and style of wine that we drink bring about a palate of change.

Cooking has moved indoors, cooking on the stove top and using our ovens again rather than cooking everything imaginable on the grill.  Warm summer days, congregating on the deck with family and friends, grilling, enjoying a cold beer or a nice glass of chilled wine are quickly winding down.

We begin thinking about food dishes that are transitional, it’s not time for winter comfort foods just yet, but it is time for a great pot of chili or soup.  Just as our desire for food changes so does our palate for wines. 

Since the beginning of time Old World Winemakers have made wines that are seasonal and specific.  In the Old World wines are made specifically to complement indigenous foods.  Old World winemakers will also make wines that are seasonally appropriate, even if they may not be known for their summer wines.  Even in Tuscany when its 90 degrees outside you need something chilled to drink.

As our desire for different styles of food is changing with the season so are our wine palates.  It is interesting how wine choices mirror the foods we are seasonally preparing.  There is a shift from lighter fare to dishes that have a bit more substance.  Wines that we now consider will also change as a result.  While it may not be time for comfort food yet it is time for comfortable soups, chili, and light stews.  So now it’s time for wines that have more body and texture.

Life is about a journey and evolution and so goes the world of wine.  How boring would it be if nothing ever changed?  Grape farming has become very specific,  not that it hasn’t been in the past.  Science and terrior have become a powerful driving force.  Grape farmers around the world now look to science and have a much deeper understanding of terroir.  This conformation of the farmers’ sixth sense and intuition produces beautiful grapes for the winemaker.  Grape farmers from around the world are not just growing fruit in general area that they know fruit grows well, it is much more specific than that.  Farmers know and understand their land and winemakers that turn the grapes into wine will be the very first to tell you the land and terrior that produce great wine.  Great winemakers comment that it’s ninety percent of the equation.

Grapes are now being planted and harvested from specific blocks of land within vineyards for winemakers to make special wines with.  Typically these are higher end wines that can be expensive.  It is important to understand where a bottle of wine comes from and why.  Farmers consider geography, soil, weather, and the grape varietal when planting vines.  The farming trend now considers this in a  grape type; is the varietal a valley grape, a hillside grape, or a hilltop grape?  This all makes a difference in the vinification or winemaking process of great wines.

Farmers and winemakers consider what grapes grow best where?  Are they a cool weather varietal that grows best in a zone 1 weather region that is the coolest growing area.  Or does a particular varietal grow best in a warm to hot zone like a region 4 or 5.  There certainly are cross over areas where grapes can thrive, but the grape farming trend now much more exact.  Grapes that are a cool weather varietal or type provide the very best fruit when grown in zone specific areas. 

Different grape varietals require what is known in the world of wine as hang time.  This means how long a grape needs to be on a vine from flowering, to actual fruit on the vine, maturation, and veraison or onset of ripening right up until the perfect moment of harvest. 

What does this mean for the wine drinker?  Why is that important in this season of change and transition? Grapes grown in various climatic zones produce wines that are very different.  Let’s take Pinot Noir as an example; a Pinot Noir that is grown in a cool weather climate like Oregon, or Burgundy will have medium body, no heavy tannin, it will show a little less depth in color, this is a wine of elegance and finesse.

A Pinot Noir made from grapes in a warmer weather zone will produce a wine that is higher in alcohol, more tannin, and more color extraction from the grape.  Wine knowledge empowers you as a consumer.   It is important to know what a wine should be so that when you approach a shelf you can make the right choice that it is of value for you.

Here are a few examples of great wines to complement your dishes in the season of change.  I hope you will enjoy these selections.

E Guigal Cotes du Rhone Red

This is a beautiful wine that is inexpensive. This blend from the well known Guigal family is 50% Syrah, 40% Grenache, and 10% Mourvèdre.  The grapes are grown in  pebbles and alluvia soil matter, sediment, limestone, granite.  This provides great drainage for the grape vines.

The grapes for this wine spend a great deal of time with the skins are fermented in a cool temperature controlled environment.  Aged 1 ½ years in oak but this wine presents with only a minimal oak influence. Visually this wine is dark red with great depth, and a beautiful shimmer. On the nose this wine has an aroma of red berries, fresh fruit, and just a hint of spice.  The palate is ample, not to full, really a great example of an affordable Cotes du Rhone.  This wine is balanced and very well made.  Nice tannin and spice that is enticing with a long rich finish.  This wine is very aromatic in a very pleasing way.

The Guigal Cotes du Rhone Red will pair nicely with cold cuts, cheese, wild game birds, pheasant and quail in particular.

Balletto 2009 Russian River Pinot Noir

This dark, garnet colored Pinot Noir exhibits floral aromas of rose petals, spicy ginger, dusty earth, and a hint of vanilla. This stellar example of a cool weather varietal fruit from the Russian River Valley delivers aromas of raspberry and cassis which are the heart of this wine.  On the palate this wine is medium textured with fine tannin, beautiful balance between fruit and acidity with an alluring spice that may be more interesting than any other wine.  This finish is long and complex; you just need another sip because you don’t want this wine to end.  This wine may age up to five years and will only improve with age, but who can wait this wine is delicious.

The Balletto 2009 Russian River Pinot Noir will pair well with beef stock based soups, a great pot of chili, beef stews, beef bourguignon, beef stroganoff, or a nice Cornish game hen with wild rice.

2007 Reininger Syrah from Walla Walla Valley

This 100% Syrah is aged in old French Oak barrels that impart very minimal oak nuances into this delicious wine.  Ripe blueberries, lavender, and subtle orange zest is your first impression of aroma with this gem from Walla Walla.  Take a second turn with your nose in the glass, smoke and earth now adorn your sense of smell.

Take a sip, on the palate this wine has nice berry and pomegranate with a subtle smokiness that is full and lush.  Not so big that you can eat this wine though, it is very well made with a refined balance and structure.  The acidity in this wine is well suited to pair with a juicy steak or a nice cut of wild game adorned with a fruit based reduction sauce.  This wine drinks great now or can be aged 2-3 years.

The wines reviewed today all receive the WineGuyMike™ Seal of Approval™

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"

“Wine for the Health of It©”with Montana Celebrity Jill Valley from KPAX-TV on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show©


Check out the radio show on The Trail 103.3FM and Fresh 104.5FM.  The live stream feed is online at http://www.trail1033.com where you can click on “Listen Live”.  The WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© airs on both radio stations Sunday mornings at 10:00AM MDT.

Each week WineGuyMike™ will be giving away gift certificates from our sponsors.  If your question is selected as WineGuyMike’s™ topic of discussion you will win one of the $20.00 – $25.00 gift certificates.  Good luck and send your questions to WineGuyMike™ on his Facebook fan page.

Social Media links;

Today’s Podcast; http://trail1033.podbean.com/2011/10/02/wine-guy-mike-for-october-2nd/

YouTube; My YouTube channel of course is WineGuyMike™ or the actual URL link: http://www.youtube.com/user/WineGuyMike?feature=mhum

Facebook; WineGuyMike please “like”

Twitter; @WineGuyMike please follow me

Sponsors      

Ciao Mambo, “Eat Like You Mean It”, located in Missoula on The Hip Strip.  Find them online at http://www.CiaoMambo.com

W.J. Deutsch & Sons since 1981 has been marketing quality wines produced by prestigious families from major wine regions of the world. 

Georges Distributing in Helena, Montana.

Jill Valley KPAX-TV Anchor

Jill Valley KPAX-TV Anchor

This week on the WineGuyMike™ Radio Show© local Montana celebrity Jill Valley from KPAX-TV in Missoula joined me in the radio studio.  Jill has been Broadcaster of the Year six times now in Montana including this year’s award.  She will quickly tell you though her biggest victory has come as the result of her winning battle against breast cancer.  Jill recently posed a question to me about wine and with this being Breast Cancer Awareness Month I suggested she come into the radio studio, that is just what she did.

It was a real pleasure to have Jill as my featured guest this week.  It was very interesting to hear her story and she made my job easy, she is very good at her profession.  Jill is a mother and has one wonderful young daughter who is an ice skater.  Jill also skates as a hobby and claims to be a “bad skater”, but I have heard otherwise from Missoula’s top age group skating Coach Patty Koster.

Jill and I have discussed wine in the past and she came to me recently and asked if I was aware of any non-alcoholic wines that tasted good.  The long and short of it was, no I was not aware of any good non-alcoholic wines.  There may be some good ones out there but I am not experienced with any.  Over time it has occurred to me that I learn more from listening than I do from talking.  Jill has done her homework her and has sought out an answer to her own question. 

The following are a few excerpts from Jill’s guest blog post, http://wp.me/PFhHw-dC, based on her research of non-alcoholic wines that are drinkable:

I started investigating the non-alcoholic wine option because even one glass makes me feel hung over the next day. But I still enjoy the taste and ritual of wine. And non-alcoholic wine lets you blend into social or business situations where you don’t have to explain why you’re not drinking. So I thought I’d give it a try – Jill’s guest blog post, http://wp.me/PFhHw-dC

CVS pharmacy has a terrific wine selection but only had Fre’, a product made by Sutter wines. CVS stocks it next to the Reunite (on ice, that’s nice) and the other wines in the giant glass jugs with twist tops which should make anyone suspicious. It was $4.99 with a twist top and wasn’t that good. I tried it years before but thought maybe technology had moved this brand ahead. If you’re the kind of person who likes to mindlessly sip wine while reading a book, this would work. Although mindlessly drinking alcohol might point to a deeper issue but I’m not your mom….so – Jill’s guest blog post, http://wp.me/PFhHw-dC

As a Montana celebrity Jill is constantly involved in community causes and events where attendees drink wine.  Unfortunately for Jill she is plagued by headaches from drinking even one glass of wine.  Jill has been searching for a solution, she too would like to enjoy a glass of wine while attending and speaking at these events.

Reactions to wine are not uncommon for many people.  It is readily assumed that such reactions are due in part to an allergic reaction of sulfites which serve as a preservative in wine.  My research results suggested that those who may suffer from reactions to wine may lack a natural enzyme in their body that will not breakdown sulfites in the wine.

Sulfites or sulfur dioxide is a fruit preservative widely used in dried fruits as well as wine.  It is also produced by the human body at the level of about 1000 mg (milligrams) per day.  Food preserved with sulfites is generally not a problem unless you are deficient in the natural enzyme that breaks it down.  For those individuals, the additional sulfites from food can be a problem.

The levels in wine average 80 mg/liter, or about 10 mg in a typical glass of wine, with slightly higher amounts in white versus red.  Many case studies show reactions by sensitive patients to drinking wine with sulfites.

All wines contain sulfites.  Yeast naturally produces sulfites during fermentation so there is only a rare wine which contains none.

The US and Australia require a “sulfite” or “preservative 220” warning label.  Nearly all wine makers add sulfites, including imported wines.  Import wines contain sulfites, but they are not legally obligated to indicate this on their labels.  European wines contain an average of 80 mg/L sulfites just as US wines do.

There are a few (very few) wine makers who make wines without adding sulfites.  In the US, organic wine must be made without added sulfites.  These are unusual because the wine is very perishable and often have unusual aromas from the aldehydes that are normally made aroma-less by the sulfites.  Look for these wines at natural food stores.

*Aldehydes – Any of a class of highly reactive organic chemical compounds obtained by oxidation of primary alcohols, characterized by the common group CHO, and used in the manufacture of resins, dyes, and organic acids.

It is possible that eating food along with your wine may reduce the severity of a reaction.  My hypothesis is this; sulfites may not be the cause of wine induced headaches or generally not feeling well as Jill has mentioned.  I suspect that people who are deficient in the natural enzyme that breaks down sulfites can be the problem.  When ingesting additional sulfites a person may have a difficult time digesting the sulfite and hence “the reaction”.  It is interesting to note that anyone you talk to who suffers from such reactions vary from mild to severe.

If you are someone who suffers from this wine dilemma you should consult with your physician concerning this issue before drinking any wine

If your physician suggests that it would okay to try wine in moderation and according to the American Medical Associations guidelines I would suggest trying organic wine or an estate produced and bottled wine.  Typically the grapes in estate produced wines grown by conscientious farmers have been treated in a similar practice to that of organically grown grapes.  Many wineries have not gone through the process of being certified organic as it is a very arduous and expensive process.   Organic and Biodynamic Agriculture practices are on the rise as wineries realize the benefits of sustainable farming practices.

The other suggestion I may offer is to select an Old World Wine as they have a tendency to be lower in alcohol.  For instance Beaujolais is a great choice as these types of wine are light-bodied, fruity, fresh, and without an abundance of tannin.  While enjoying wine at lunch the French use sparkling mineral water to dilute their wine which greatly reduces the alcohol content. 

 This is a great solution for a person in a social situation who wants to enjoy a glass of wine with the rest of the crowd.  A glass of wine diluted by ½ or 2/3 sparking water still maintains a beautiful color in your glass.  The wine still provides the palate with a nice taste experience.  San Pellegrino is my favorite brand to use when mixing sparkling water with my wine.  Drink in moderation and good health and may we all raise a glass during Breast Cancer Awareness month in acknowledgement of our fellow wine lovers who have been touched by this illness.   

I want to personally thank my friend Jill Valley for taking time out to join me on the show this week.  She is a very brave, humble, and courageous woman who has survived her battle with cancer.  In wellness Jill is a crusader for the prevention and cure of this illness that has touched all of our lives.  Jill, cheers to you.

"from my table to yours"

"from my table to yours"